Aphthous Lesions and Hypersensitivity Reactions

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60 Questions

What is the common layman term for after lesions?

What is the derived meaning of the term 'afters'?

What is the suspected cause of after lesions?

What is the role of TNF alpha in the pathogenesis of after lesions?

What is the suspected genetic component in the development of after lesions?

What is the term 'afters' already indicative of?

Which factor contributes to the development of aphthous ulcers?

What is a contributing factor to the development of minor aphthous ulcers?

What is a clinical variant of aphthous ulcers?

What can trigger aphthous ulcers?

What is the age range where patients often develop their first aphthous ulcers?

How long does it take for minor aphthous ulcers to heal?

Where are minor aphthous ulcers likely to occur?

What is a common prodromal symptom experienced by patients before developing oral aphthous ulcers?

What is the typical size range of the ulcers associated with oral aphthous ulcers?

Where are major aphthous ulcers commonly found?

What is a challenging aspect of diagnosing major aphthous ulcers?

What is a characteristic of herpetiform aphthous ulcers?

Which of the following is a characteristic of oral ulcers in Behcet syndrome?

What is a common management approach for Behcet syndrome?

What is a known trigger for the ulcers in Behcet syndrome?

Which organ systems can be affected by Behcet syndrome?

What is the racial predilection of Behcet syndrome?

What is a common manifestation of ocular involvement in Behcet syndrome?

What is the major triggering factor for most patients with erythema multiforme?

Which oral lesions are typically involved in erythema multiforme?

What is the classic presentation of erythema multiforme?

How long does erythema multiforme typically take to heal?

What is crucial for the management of erythema multiforme?

Which condition tends to affect younger patients compared to toxic epidermal necrolysis?

What is the layman term for after lesions?

What is the meaning of the term 'afters'?

What is the suspected cause of after lesions?

What is the common trigger for after lesions in some patients?

What is the role of TNF alpha in the pathogenesis of after lesions?

What is the suspected component in the development of after lesions?

What is a contributing factor to the development of minor aphthous ulcers?

What is a clinical variant of aphthous ulcers?

Where are minor aphthous ulcers likely to occur?

What is a characteristic of herpetiform aphthous ulcers?

What is a common manifestation of ocular involvement in Behcet syndrome?

What is a common trigger for aphthous ulcers?

What is a challenging aspect of diagnosing Behcet syndrome?

What is a known trigger for the ulcers in Behcet syndrome?

What is a characteristic of herpetiform aphthous ulcers?

What is a common manifestation of ocular involvement in Behcet syndrome?

What is the racial predilection of Behcet syndrome?

Where are minor aphthous ulcers likely to occur?

Which type of aphthous ulcers are exclusively located on movable, non-keratinized mucosa?

What is the typical healing time for major aphthous ulcers?

What is a rare variant of aphthous ulcers, mostly seen in adults, involving the movable mucosa with a female predominance?

Which condition is often required to be excluded when diagnosing major aphthous ulcers?

What is the size range of the ulcers associated with oral aphthous ulcers?

Where are oral aphthous ulcers unlikely to occur?

Which of the following is a characteristic of the skin lesions in erythema multiforme?

What is the typical presentation of oral lesions in erythema multiforme?

Which condition is more severe and involves more than 30% of the body surface?

What is the classic presentation of erythema multiforme?

What is the major triggering factor for most patients with erythema multiforme?

What are the prodromal symptoms that patients with erythema multiforme may present with?

Summary

Erythema Multiforme: Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Management

  • Erythema multiforme is a blistering ulcerative micro cutaneous disease with uncertain pathogenesis, believed to be immunologically mediated.
  • The major triggering factor for most patients is herpes simplex virus infection.
  • Patients with erythema multiforme may present with prodromal symptoms such as headache, malaise, sore throat, and cough one week before the development of skin lesions.
  • Skin lesions are described as targeted or bullseye lesions, with concentric circular erythematous rings on the extremities or face.
  • Oral lesions typically involve the labial mucosa, vermilion, tongue, buccal mucosa, and soft palate, with sparing of the gingiva.
  • The classic presentation of erythema multiforme includes hemorrhagic crusting of the lips, covered with dried blood.
  • Erythema multiforme is a self-limiting condition that heals within 2 to 6 weeks and is managed with topical or systemic corticosteroids.
  • Intravenous rehydration may be necessary for patients with severe oral ulcers.
  • Identifying the initiating factor, such as herpes infection or medications, is crucial for management.
  • Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome are severe conditions with different pathogenesis from erythema multiforme, mainly triggered by medications.
  • Stevens-Johnson syndrome tends to affect younger patients, while toxic epidermal necrolysis affects older patients and is more severe, involving more than 30% of the body surface.
  • Patients with these conditions develop flu-like symptoms before the onset of skin lesions.

Erythema Multiforme: Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Management

  • Erythema multiforme is a blistering ulcerative micro cutaneous disease with uncertain pathogenesis, believed to be immunologically mediated.
  • The major triggering factor for most patients is herpes simplex virus infection.
  • Patients with erythema multiforme may present with prodromal symptoms such as headache, malaise, sore throat, and cough one week before the development of skin lesions.
  • Skin lesions are described as targeted or bullseye lesions, with concentric circular erythematous rings on the extremities or face.
  • Oral lesions typically involve the labial mucosa, vermilion, tongue, buccal mucosa, and soft palate, with sparing of the gingiva.
  • The classic presentation of erythema multiforme includes hemorrhagic crusting of the lips, covered with dried blood.
  • Erythema multiforme is a self-limiting condition that heals within 2 to 6 weeks and is managed with topical or systemic corticosteroids.
  • Intravenous rehydration may be necessary for patients with severe oral ulcers.
  • Identifying the initiating factor, such as herpes infection or medications, is crucial for management.
  • Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome are severe conditions with different pathogenesis from erythema multiforme, mainly triggered by medications.
  • Stevens-Johnson syndrome tends to affect younger patients, while toxic epidermal necrolysis affects older patients and is more severe, involving more than 30% of the body surface.
  • Patients with these conditions develop flu-like symptoms before the onset of skin lesions.

Description

Test your knowledge of erythema multiforme with this quiz on the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of this blistering cutaneous disease. Explore its association with herpes simplex virus infection, characteristic skin and oral lesions, and the appropriate management strategies. Also, learn about the differences between erythema multiforme, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

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