Directive Principles of State Policy (DPSPs) in Indian Constitution Quiz

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10 Questions

Who was the chief architect of the Indian Constitution?

B.R. Ambedkar

What is the enforcement status of Directive Principles of State Policy in India?

Not legally enforceable

In which part of the Indian Constitution are the Directive Principles of State Policy found?

Part IV

Which of the following is NOT a key idea covered by Directive Principles of State Policy?

Political supremacy

What is the main purpose of Directive Principles of State Policy (DPSPs) in the Indian Constitution?

To guide the state's actions and policies towards social justice

Which institution in India has emphasized that DPSPs are part of the basic structure of the Constitution?

The Supreme Court of India

Under which article of the Indian Constitution does the State have the responsibility to promote educational and economic interests of Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes?

Article 46

What is the judicial implication of Directive Principles of State Policy in India?

They guide judicial interpretation of other parts of the Constitution

Which aspect does Article 41 of the DPSPs cover in the Indian Constitution?

Right to Work and Public Assistance

How do Directive Principles of State Policy influence the interpretation of the Indian Constitution?

By providing a framework for just governance and equitable policies

Study Notes

Directive Principles of State Policy (DPSPs) and the Indian Constitution

Directive Principles of State Policy (DPSPs) are a unique and influential aspect of the Indian Constitution, designed to serve as guiding principles for the state's actions and policies. These principles, introduced in the Constitution's Part IV, are not legally enforceable, but their role is to inspire and guide the legislative and executive branches to strive for a just, egalitarian, and harmonious society.

This article delves into the background, key ideas, and some of the most relevant DPSPs.

Background

DPSPs were incorporated into the Indian Constitution by B. R. Ambedkar, the chief architect of the Indian Constitution, as a visionary response to the country's pressing social, economic, and political challenges. The principles are inspired by the Indian Constitution's Preamble, which emphasizes a commitment to social, economic, and political justice, equality, liberty, and fraternity.

Key Ideas

The DPSPs can be divided into several broad categories:

  1. Social justice: To promote social and economic equality, eliminate untouchability, and ensure fair and equal access to opportunities, resources, and public services.
  2. Economic welfare: To protect the rights of workers, promote employment, improve living conditions, and regulate production and distribution of goods.
  3. Education: To provide free and compulsory education, encourage the establishment of educational institutions, and promote the dissemination of knowledge.
  4. Public health: To ensure the provision of public health services and regulate medical practices.
  5. International relations: To foster peace, promote friendly relations among nations, and respect international agreements.

Despite being non-justiciable, the DPSPs have significant judicial implications. The Supreme Court of India has repeatedly emphasized that the principles are part of the basic structure of the Constitution, and their implementation is necessary to uphold the rule of law and constitutional integrity. The Court has also stated that while DPSPs cannot be enforced in a court of law, they can guide judicial interpretation of other parts of the Constitution.

Selected DPSPs

Some of the most relevant DPSPs include:

  • Article 38: The State must strive to promote the welfare of the people by securing and protecting as effectively as it may a social order in which justice, social, economic, and political, shall inform all the institutions of the national life.

  • Article 39: The State must ensure that citizens have access to work, education, and living conditions adequate for their health and well-being.

  • Article 41: The State must provide public assistance to its citizens in case of unemployment, old age, sickness, or disablement, and in other cases of undeserved want.

  • Article 46: The State must promote the educational and economic interests of the downtrodden sections of society, specifically the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes.

Conclusion

As a crucial component of the Indian Constitution, the DPSPs represent a visionary commitment to social, economic, and political justice. While not legally enforceable, DPSPs have a profound impact on the Indian Constitution's interpretation and serve as a guiding force for the state's actions and policies.

The principle of DPSPs underscores the fact that the Indian Constitution is a living document, capable of adapting to changing social, economic, and political conditions. As such, the DPSPs continue to inspire and guide Indian citizens and policymakers as they strive to create a just, egalitarian, and harmonious society.

Test your knowledge on the Directive Principles of State Policy (DPSPs) in the Indian Constitution through this quiz. Explore the background, key ideas, and selected DPSPs to understand their role in shaping social, economic, and political justice in India.

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