Chinese Philosophy

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9 Questions

What were the three major philosophical schools that arose in China during the Hundred Schools of Thought period?

Which of the following was responsible for creating the world's first meritocracy?

Which philosophical schools were the largest rivals to Confucianism before the Han dynasty?

What was the Xuanxue philosophical school known for?

Which philosophy promotes universal love with the aim of mutual benefit, and everyone must love each other equally and impartially to avoid conflict and war?

Which of the following is not a common term found in Chinese philosophy?

What was the revived version of old Confucian principles that appeared around the Song dynasty, with Buddhist, Taoist, and Legalist features?

What was the official philosophy during the short Qin dynasty, while Mohist and Confucianist schools were quashed?

Which intellectual movement of Confucianism began in the early 20th century in Republican China?

Summary

Chinese Philosophy: A Summary

  • Chinese philosophy began in the Spring and Autumn period and Warring States period, during a period known as the "Hundred Schools of Thought".

  • The major philosophical schools of China that arose were Confucianism, Legalism, and Taoism, along with philosophies that later fell into obscurity, like Agriculturalism, Mohism, Chinese Naturalism, and the Logicians.

  • Confucianism is still the creed of etiquette for Chinese society and is responsible for creating the world's first meritocracy.

  • Before the Han dynasty, the largest rivals to Confucianism were Chinese Legalism, and Mohism.

  • The Six Dynasties era saw the rise of the Xuanxue philosophical school and the maturation of Chinese Buddhism, which had entered China from India during the Late Han dynasties.

  • During the 19th and 20th centuries, Chinese philosophy integrated concepts from Western philosophy.

  • Confucianism reached its peak of influence during the Tang and Song dynasties under a rebranded Confucianism called Neo-Confucianism.

  • Taoism arose as a philosophy and later also developed into a religion based on the texts the Tao Te Ching and the Zhuangzi.

  • Legalism was highly progressive but would be blamed for creating a totalitarian society, experiencing decline.

  • Mohism promotes universal love with the aim of mutual benefit, and everyone must love each other equally and impartially to avoid conflict and war.

  • The logicians were concerned with logic, paradoxes, names, and actuality.

  • Agriculturalism was an early agrarian social and political philosophy that advocated peasant utopian communalism and egalitarianism.A Brief History of Chinese Philosophy

  • Legalism was the official philosophy during the short Qin dynasty, while Mohist and Confucianist schools were quashed.

  • Confucianism and Taoism became the determining forces of Chinese thought until the introduction of Buddhism.

  • Dong Zhongshu integrated Confucianism with the thoughts of the Zhongshu School and the theory of the Five Elements.

  • Xuanxue was a philosophical school that combined elements of Confucianism and Taoism to reinterpret the I Ching, Tao Te Ching, and Zhuangzi.

  • Buddhism arrived in China around the 1st century AD, and both Indian schools and local Chinese sects arose from the 5th century.

  • Neo-Confucianism was a revived version of old Confucian principles that appeared around the Song dynasty, with Buddhist, Taoist, and Legalist features.

  • During the Qing dynasty, there was a return to the Han dynasty Confucianism.

  • Chinese philosophy had also begun to integrate concepts of Western philosophy during the Industrial and Modern Ages, as steps toward modernization.

  • When the Chinese Communist Party took over the reign, previous schools of thought, excepting notably Legalism, were denounced as backward, and later even purged during the Cultural Revolution.

  • New Confucianism is an intellectual movement of Confucianism that began in the early 20th century in Republican China.

  • Common terms found in Chinese philosophy include yin and yang, qi, li, dao, and ren.

  • Commonalities of Chinese philosophies include a focus on ethics, practicality, and the concept of harmony.

Description

Test your knowledge of Chinese philosophy with this informative quiz! From the Hundred Schools of Thought to the rise and fall of major philosophical schools like Confucianism, Taoism, and Legalism, this quiz covers the key concepts and historical events that shaped Chinese philosophy. Discover the common terms and themes found in Chinese philosophy, and see how much you know about the ethics, practicality, and concept of harmony that underpin this fascinating field. Put your knowledge to the test and see how well you can

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