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Science EOQ 4 Exam 2023-2024

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70 Questions

Gabrielle pulls a toy car 10 meters with a force of 200N. How much work has she done?

2000 j

Jack drags a shopping bag for 1000 meters with a force of 150N. How much work was done?

150,000j

. A 5kg cat is lifted 2m into the air. How much GPE does it gain? (Round gravity to 10 instead of 9.8)

100 j

A larger box with a mass of 70kg is lifted 5m in to the air. How much GPE does it gain? (Round gravity to 10 instead of 9.8)

3,500 j

An angry bull with a mass of 700kg runs at 10 m/s. How much kinetic energy does it have?

35,000 j

A waddling armadillo of mass 6kg moves at 5 m/s. How much kinetic energy does it have?

75 j

Look at the diagram. Calculate the net force. Include the net force and the direction (left, right, up, or down) in your answer.

4N left

Look at the diagram. Calculate the net force. Include the net force and the direction (left, right, up, or down) in your answer.

2N left

Friction is a contact force.

True

Magnetism is a contact force.

False

Gravity is a contact force.

False

Tension is a contact force.

True

Air resistance is a contact force.

True

Light is a type of kinetic energy.

True

Gravitational energy is a type of kinetic energy.

False

Elastic is a type of kinetic energy.

False

Thermal energy is a type of kinetic energy.

True

Using the 5 senses to help learn more about something (sight, hearing, tasting, feeling, and smelling)

Observing

Forming an idea of why something happened in the past based on observations

Inferring

Forming an idea of what will happen in the future based on observations

Predicting

Organizing or separating things by how they are alike or different

Classifying

Finding the size, mass, volume, distance, weight, or temperature of anything. Involves numbers and units

Measuring

Conducting controlled test that will help determine if a hypothesis is correct.

Experimenting

Looking at the data and finding patterns

Analyzing data

Using the information gained to try to explain or understand something. Figuring out what the patterns mean.

Interpreting Data:

The force that opposes motion between objects that are in contact.

Friction

An object's resistance to changes in motion.

Inertia

How fast an object is traveling. Calculated by dividing distance by time.

Speed

How fast an object is traveling and the direction the object is traveling.

Velocity

Any change in an object's speed or direction. (change in velocity)

Acceleration

A change in an object's position.

Motion

Models are used to study things that are too big, too small, too distant, or too complicated to study through direct observations. Which is NOT a model?

a list of supplies in a science lab

John is drawing diagrams to demonstrate the ways light can travel. What should he label box one?

Transmit

John is drawing diagrams to demonstrate the ways light can travel. What should he label box on two?

Reflect

John is drawing diagrams to demonstrate the ways light can travel. What should he label box three?

Absorb

John is drawing diagrams to demonstrate the ways light can travel. What should he label box four?

Refract

Look at the wave diagram. What property of a wave is shown at point 1?

Wavelength

Look at the wave diagram. What property of a wave is shown at point 2?

Trough

Look at the wave diagram. What property of a wave is shown at point 3?

Amplitude

Look at the wave diagram. What property of a wave is shown at point 4?

Crest

Which electromagnetic wave is located at position 2?

Microwave

Which electromagnatic wave is located at position 7?

Gamma

In which position would you find visible light?

4

Where on the diagram would the ball have the most potential energy?

A

Where on the diagram would the ball have the most kinetic energy?

D

What are the forces that work against inertia?

Friction and Gravity

What determines the amount of inertia an objects has?

Mass

A scientist must repeat his/her experiment several times and get the same results. What is this process called

Repetition

Scientists will often repeat another scientist's experiment to see if the first results are valid. What is this process called?

Replication

If A scientist wants to ensure their results are reliable, what should they focus on?

Consistent repetition

What does a Scientific Law do?

State what will always occur in natural conditions.

What is a hypothesis?

A statement that can be tested

What is the difference between a scientifc law and a scientific theory?

Laws only state what will happen, theories axplain why something will happen.

Why do scientists develop a hypothesis before they conduct their experiments?

It helps predict outcomes and design the experiment.

John shines a light on a piece of plastic. None of the light passes through the plastic. What does this tell us about the plastice

it is opaque

A green house is made of a special plastic. The plastic allows some light through but everything inside appears blurry. What word below describes the green house?

It is translucent

These waves must have a medium for the energy to transfer through.

Mechanical waves

These are the only waves that can travel without passing through a medium.

Electromagnetic waves

When we see a straw in a glass of water it may look broken or bent. Why does this occur?

The light is refracted

John shines a white light on a box. When he does the box appears green. Why does this happen?

The box reflects the green color

What type of friction would be used by an object sitting on a shelf?

Static friction

What type of friction would be used by a sky diviver falling through the air?

Fluid friction

In an experiment scientist test a hypothesis. They can only test one thing at a time. What do we call the one thing they are testing/manipulating?

Independent variable

For scientists to get valid results they can only test one thing at a time. This means they have to keep everything else exactly the same/constant. What do we call all the things kept the same?

Controlled variable

Which does NOT receive the independent variable during an experiment?

Control group

What does the Law of Conservation of Energy state? (You MUST state all parts.)

Energy is never created or destroyed. It can only be transfered to a new place or transformed into a different type.

Explain why sound cannot travel in a vacuum .

Sound is a mechanical wave. It needs matter/medium to transfer energy.

  1. John wants to conduct an investigation to see if the angle light is reflected increases the temperature on the object it is reflected on. He has on mirror straight up. The second he changes to an 80 degree angle, another is placed at a 70 degree angle the last one is place at a 65 degree angle. He then shines a heat lamp on each and records the temperature on the object below after 5 minutes. What is the independent variable and what is the dependent variable?

the independent variable is the angle of the light. The dependent variable is the temperature of the object.

List the steps of the scientific method in order. Omit the 7th step communication.

  1. Identify the problem/question.
  2. Background research
  3. Create a hypothesis.
  4. Experiment
  5. Analyze data
  6. Interpret data and make conclusion

How are speed and velocity alike? How are the 2 different.

Speed and velocity both tell how fast an object moves. Velocity also includes the direction the object is traveling in.

Study Notes

Work and Energy

  • Gabrielle does 2000 J of work when she pulls a toy car 10 meters with a force of 200 N.
  • Jack does 150000 J of work when he drags a shopping bag for 1000 meters with a force of 150 N.
  • A 5 kg cat gains 100 J of gravitational potential energy (GPE) when lifted 2 meters into the air.
  • A 70 kg box gains 3500 J of GPE when lifted 5 meters into the air.
  • An angry bull with a mass of 700 kg has 35000 J of kinetic energy when running at 10 m/s.
  • A waddling armadillo with a mass of 6 kg has 45 J of kinetic energy when moving at 5 m/s.

Forces and Friction

  • Friction is a contact force that opposes motion between objects that are in contact.
  • Tension is a contact force.
  • Gravity is a non-contact force.
  • Air resistance is a contact force.
  • Magnetism is a non-contact force.

Science and Investigation

  • Observation involves using the 5 senses to learn more about something.
  • Inference involves forming an idea of why something happened in the past based on observations.
  • Prediction involves forming an idea of what will happen in the future based on observations.
  • Classification involves organizing or separating things by how they are alike or different.
  • Measurement involves finding the size, mass, volume, distance, weight, or temperature of anything.
  • Experimentation involves conducting controlled tests to determine if a hypothesis is correct.
  • Data analysis involves looking at the data and finding patterns.
  • Explanation involves using the information gained to try to explain or understand something.

Models and Waves

  • Models are used to study things that are too big, too small, too distant, or too complicated to study through direct observations.
  • Light can travel in different ways, including reflection, refraction, and diffraction.

Waves and Electromagnetic Spectrum

  • The electromagnetic spectrum includes different types of waves, including gamma rays, X-rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, infrared light, microwaves, and radio waves.
  • Visible light is located at position 5 on the electromagnetic spectrum.

Inertia and Energy

  • Inertia is an object's resistance to changes in motion.
  • The forces that work against inertia are friction, air resistance, and gravity.
  • The amount of inertia an object has is determined by its mass.
  • Kinetic energy is the energy of motion.
  • Potential energy is stored energy.

Scientific Method

  • The scientific method involves repeating an experiment several times to get the same results.
  • Repeating another scientist's experiment to see if the first results are valid is called replication.
  • Ensuring reliable results involves focusing on the controlled variables and the independent variable.
  • A scientific law describes a consistent pattern in nature.
  • A hypothesis is an educated guess that can be tested.
  • A scientific theory is a well-substantiated explanation for a set of phenomena.
  • Scientists develop a hypothesis before conducting experiments to guide their investigation.

Light and Optics

  • When light passes through a medium, it can be refracted, or bent.
  • Total internal reflection occurs when light hits a surface at a shallow angle and bounces back.
  • John shines a light on a piece of plastic, and none of the light passes through, indicating that the plastic is opaque.
  • A green house made of special plastic allows some light through, but everything inside appears blurry, indicating that the plastic is translucent.

Friction and Forces

  • Static friction is the force that prevents an object from moving when a force is applied.
  • Kinetic friction is the force that slows down an object that is already moving.
  • Friction is necessary for an object to stop or change direction.

Independent and Dependent Variables

  • The independent variable is the one thing being tested or manipulated in an experiment.
  • The dependent variable is the thing being measured or observed in response to the independent variable.
  • The controlled variables are the things kept the same to ensure a fair test.

Law of Conservation of Energy

  • The Law of Conservation of Energy states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted from one form to another.

Students will be assessed on all materials studied during quarters 3 and 4.

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