The Door of No Return by Kwame Alexander Multiple Choice Questions

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250 Questions

What did the river Offin carry on its shoulders at the first breath of the boy?

Where does the river Offin flow into?

What did the foreigners disguised as friends pretend to be?

What did the river Offin hold the boy like?

What leads to a confrontation between the protagonist's cousin and the protagonist?

What does Mr. Phillip emphasize to the protagonist and his classmates?

What does Mr. Phillip encourage the protagonist to focus on?

Where does the protagonist find solace and engage in diving and swimming?

What does the protagonist contemplate while at the secluded spot by the river?

What does the protagonist recall about a near-death experience?

What is the nature of the protagonist's relationship with his cousin?

Who does the protagonist rush to meet at the river?

What does the protagonist receive from Mr. Phillip at the river?

What does the protagonist and his cousin's physical battle result in?

What does the protagonist find in the serene, clear waters of the secluded spot?

What does Mr. Phillip emphasize as crucial for the protagonist's future?

What is the central symbol of the river in the story?

What traditional game is Kofi's older brother, Kwasi, unbeatable at?

Where does Kofi's father spend his days while away mining?

What does the river symbolize in the story?

What themes are highlighted in the narrative?

What do Kofi's conversations with Ebo and Kwasi provide insight into?

What is the protagonist's name in the story?

Who encourages Kofi to express his feelings for Ama?

What kind of location does Kofi consider the river to be for him?

Where is the story set?

What does the narrative reflect?

What do the protagonist's interactions with family members provide a glimpse into?

What event leads to physical violence in the story?

What is the purpose of the Bambara Treaty?

What does the protagonist receive from their mother for a festival?

What leads to the protagonist being caned by Mr. Goodluck Phillip?

What is part of the Kings Festival at Bayere?

What does the cousin boast about during the dispute?

What is the purpose of the festival's activities?

What is recounted during the festival, leading to the Bambara Treaty?

What language does the protagonist get scolded for speaking?

What does Ama respond with during the dispute?

What leads to the annual Kings Festival at Bayere?

What is the purpose of the dispute between the protagonist's cousin and Ama?

What is the name of the village storyteller in the text?

What is the name of Kofi's friend who works as a house girl after her parents' death?

What is the name of Kofi's teacher who enforces English language and culture?

What activity is Kofi punished with for speaking Twi?

Who leads a group of youngsters in search of gold specks after heavy rainfall?

What does Ama use to care for Kofi's injuries?

What is the primary theme of the story?

What language does Kofi's teacher enforce on the students?

What does Kofi's friend, Ebo, lead a group of youngsters in search of after heavy rainfall?

What does Kofi secretly enjoy while staying after school for punishment?

What does the protagonist, Kofi, face challenges with in school?

What does the story highlight about Kofi and Ama's relationship?

What does the festival's activities include?

What does the masked dancer from Upper perform at the festival?

What do the women fighters do during the matches at the festival?

What do the spectators do when the spider-like routine is performed?

What is the primary consequence of Kwasi's victory in the wrestling contest?

What is the Council of Elders' decision regarding Kwasi's involvement in Yaw's death?

What is the initial reaction of Lower Kwanta to the Council's decision?

What is the atmosphere in the village following the Council's decision?

What event does Kwasi miss due to a stomachache?

What is the nature of the school environment in the village?

What leads to concerns about facing a heartless giant named Bonsu in the wrestling tournament?

What is the prize for the winner of the final wrestling match?

What does the narrator's brother teach a lesson about through a game of Oware?

What ultimately renders Bonsu unable to walk and forces Lower to replace him in the tournament?

Who surprises everyone with agility and eventually defeats Kwasi in the final wrestling match?

What does the story primarily highlight about the narrator's brother, Kwasi?

What does the wrestling tournament emphasize?

What does Bonsu display in the tournament?

What does the narrator's brother draw inspiration from when facing the giant, Bonsu?

What is the theme highlighted in the story?

What does the narrator's brother ultimately demonstrate through the wrestling tournament?

What does Kwasi showcase in the final battle against Prince Yaw Boateng?

What is the reward for winning the women’s wrestling match?

What are people's first names based on in the village?

What challenge does Kofi's cousin taunt him with?

What makes Bonsu a favorite in the wrestling contest?

What does Ebo encourage Kofi to do?

What is the primary feature of the wrestling contest?

What do people have in addition to their first names based on the day they were born?

What does Kofi nervously offer to a girl while trying to talk to her?

What is the nature of the wrestling match between the women?

What does Ebo challenge Kofi to?

What does the text primarily depict?

What does Ama try to encourage Kofi to do?

What is the protagonist's reason for challenging Little Kofi to a swimming contest?

What do the boys do after being discovered by Ama while spying on the girls by the river?

What cultural practice does Ama share with the protagonist and Ebo?

What does Ama express concern about regarding the protagonist's brother?

What do the boys do after catching a fish in the river?

What do the boys imitate during a lighthearted moment?

What is the nature of the exchange at the end of the story?

What leads to the boys being granted some freedom to talk in class?

What do the boys tease Ebo about after the swimming competition?

What do the boys find by the river while discussing the upcoming swimming race?

What does the protagonist reflect on during the morning assembly?

What does the boys' conversation with Ama reveal about the protagonist's reason for challenging Little Kofi?

What does the protagonist do after Ebo challenges him to stay underwater longer?

What does the protagonist think about the talking drum sound they hear?

What does Ebo imitate, leading the protagonist to burst into laughter?

What does the protagonist compare his swimming to while racing Ebo?

What advice does Nana Mosi give about letting go of anger and hurt?

What does Kwasi plan to pursue as a new life in Upper Kwanta?

What do Kwasi and Kofi encounter in the woods?

What does Kwasi urge Kofi to do?

What do Kofi and Kwasi play, ending in a draw?

What does Kofi struggle with in relation to his cousin?

What do the boys discuss about Kwasi's upcoming event?

What does Kwasi share details about with Kofi?

What does Kofi reminisce about while racing against Kwasi?

What does the text primarily depict?

What does Kwasi plan to do without telling Maame?

What does Kwasi emerge from seclusion to do?

What is Kofi's favorite food?

What swimming technique does Kofi practice?

What is Kofi preparing for?

Who gives Kofi tips on improving his swimming technique?

What does Kofi make for Ama?

What does Kofi plan to celebrate with a special gift?

What is the name of Kofi's cousin?

What does Kofi doubt his ability to win?

What does Ama encourage Kofi to do?

Where does Kofi practice his swimming technique?

What does Kofi impress his friend Ebo with?

What does Kofi plan to perform for his initiation into manhood?

What does the story emphasize the importance of?

What is the protagonist advised to think of for his birthday?

What is the river Offin described as in the story?

What do the 'wonderfuls' in the story want?

What is the primary theme highlighted in the story?

What does the protagonist's father and Nana Mosi discuss the need to do?

What does the protagonist's growing curiosity hint at?

What does the protagonist struggle with in the water?

What is the protagonist's brother, Kwasi, troubled by?

What is the narrative filled with, creating a sense of mystery and anticipation?

What do the adults deflect the protagonist's questions about?

What is the protagonist encouraged to do by Nana Mosi?

What are the activities involved in the initiation described in the text?

What theme does the narrative primarily delve into?

Where does Nana Mosi believe ancestors dwell to assist during times of need?

What setting does the story primarily take place in?

What is the atmosphere in the text primarily filled with?

What is the protagonist's relationship with his brother Ebo?

What happens to the protagonist in the dark, leading to a realization that it's not a dream?

Who holds the protagonist captive with a machete in the text?

What does the narrative describe as a transition from boy to manhood?

What belief does Nana Mosi hold about rivers in the text?

What is the protagonist's realization about the situation in the dark?

What is the primary focus of the initiation described in the text?

What does the protagonist swallow to soothe their bitter present?

What sounds does the protagonist hear in the text?

What does the protagonist believe about the people in their situation?

What does the protagonist think when Two Fish points to the tea?

What ultimately happens to Two Fish?

What do the captors demand from Two Fish?

Where is the group taken after Two Fish's death?

What do the captors refer to the castle as?

What is the demeanor of the captors known as 'The Wonderfuls'?

What do the captors receive as a reward after conversing with two tall guards?

What happens to Osei while escaping through the bush and rocky springs?

What forces the group to slow down while being pursued by captors?

How does Two Fish respond to the captors?

What do the captors do upon reaching the group at the edge of a cliff?

What greets the group at the castle entrance?

What fate awaits the captured group at the castle?

What does the narrator vow to do once he is free?

What does the narrator do while in captivity?

Who helps the narrator and others escape from captivity?

What do the captors do after a meal, providing an opportunity for escape?

What does the narrator reflect on while in captivity?

What prevents any form of celebration or remembrance for the narrator's brother, who was killed in captivity?

What technique does the narrator use to escape from captivity?

What do the captors do to force-feed the narrator's brother, who refuses to eat or drink?

What does the narrator reflect on regarding his family while in captivity?

What is the atmosphere when the captors fall asleep after a meal?

What does the narrator and the other captives fear before deciding to run for their freedom?

What is the primary focus of the narrator's prayer while in captivity?

What brings distractions from the agony of captivity in the text?

What is the significance of Nimdee, the talking goat, in the text?

Who finds solace in sleeping on Afua's lap in the text?

What themes are expressed in the text?

What do the narrator and Afua share a moment of healing through in the text?

Who does the narrator describe as a resilient and wise captive in the text?

What is the name of the fellow captive who shares her background and experiences in the dungeon in the text?

What does the narrator find distractions from in the text?

What is the significance of storytelling in the text?

What does the narrator share stories about in the text?

What is the primary focus of the text?

What brings a moment of healing for the captives in the text?

What do the red coats do to the captives?

How is the dungeon described in the narrative?

What does the protagonist experience in the dungeon?

What does the dark lady warn the protagonist against?

What does the text convey about the situation of the captives?

What does the narrative highlight about the captives' treatment?

What do the red coats demand for the captives?

What do the captives experience before being thrown into the dungeon?

What does the protagonist reflect on regarding the red coats?

What emotions are experienced by the captives in the narrative?

What does the dungeon in the narrative smell like?

What does the protagonist dream about in the dungeon?

What does the protagonist do each nightfall?

What do the men with no color do on day twelve?

What do the men with no color do by the twilight of day nineteen?

What does the protagonist carry in their heart when falling asleep on NIGHT EIGHT?

What does the Adinkra symbol Sankofa represent?

Where is the town of Bonwire located?

What does the Adinkra symbol Mpatapo symbolize?

Which river is the largest out of the three principal rivers in Ghana?

What does the Adinkra symbol Funtunfunefu-Denkyemfunefu represent?

Where is the city of Kumasi located?

What does the Adinkra symbol Nkyinkyim symbolize?

Which city is known as the largest city in Ghana?

What does the Adinkra symbol Epa symbolize?

Where is the Cape Coast located?

What does the Adinkra symbol Aya represent?

Where is the Offin River located?

What does Afua do to resist captivity?

How does Kofi feel after Afua's mutiny and subsequent actions?

What event leads to chaos and destruction on the ship?

How is the sea portrayed in the text?

What does Kofi witness while held captive on the ship?

What does Afua reveal to Kofi, hinting at a potential revolt among the captives?

What does Kofi reflect on in relation to the captivity?

What does the ship ultimately face?

What does Afua do during the mutiny?

How does Kofi feel after the ship wrecks?

What does the text primarily depict the sea as?

What does Afua use to resist captivity?

What does the author express gratitude for in the book?

What did the author describe as a significant influence on his soul and eventual writing of the book?

What did the author describe himself as despite the challenges faced during the writing process?

What did the author express gratitude for in making the book possible?

What did the author acknowledge the role of in shaping the protagonist's understanding of African heritage?

What did the author describe as a three-year contemplation period before writing the book?

What influenced the protagonist's understanding of African heritage according to the author?

What did the author describe as having a significant impact on his soul and eventual writing of the book?

What language is the Twi glossary in?

How many letters are in the Twi alphabet?

What does 'akwaaba' mean in the Twi language?

Which group of people speak the Twi language?

What is the significance of 'nana' in the Twi glossary?

What does the Twi word 'kenkey' refer to?

What does the Twi word 'aboa' mean?

Where did the author have a residency to work on their book?

Who does the author dedicate the book, 'The Door of No Return,' to?

What does the author provide insights into through the Twi glossary?

What does the author express gratitude for in the acknowledgments?

What is the significance of the Little, Brown Books for Young Readers in the acknowledgments?

Summary

The Village Storyteller

  • Nana Mosi, the village storyteller, begins his tales in a deliberate manner, speaking slowly and repeating certain phrases, captivating his audience.
  • The protagonist, Kofi, faces challenges in school, including a teacher who enforces English language and culture, and uses physical punishment for speaking Twi, the local language.
  • Kofi's teacher, Goodluck Kwaku Phillip, imposes English culture and language on the students, and insists on being called by his Anglicized name.
  • Kofi's friend, Ama, faces adversity after her parents' death and works as a house girl in exchange for food and shelter.
  • Kofi's punishment for speaking Twi is to stay after school and learn English literature, an activity he secretly enjoys.
  • Ama cares for Kofi's injuries using traditional remedies, showcasing her compassion and resourcefulness.
  • Kofi's older brother, Kwasi, shares an incident where a classmate was physically punished for speaking Twi in response to the teacher's imposition of English.
  • Kofi's teacher, Mr. Phillip, enforces English language and culture, and uses physical punishment for any deviation.
  • Kofi's friend, Ebo, leads a group of youngsters in search of gold specks in the streets and ditches after heavy rainfall, highlighting the economic challenges faced by the community.
  • Kofi and Ama share a close bond, having known each other since childhood and supporting each other through difficult times.
  • The story highlights the clash between traditional African culture and the imposition of English language and culture in a village school.
  • The protagonist, Kofi, navigates the challenges of cultural imposition, physical punishment, and economic hardship while finding solace in his friendship with Ama and the wisdom of his village storyteller, Nana Mosi.

A Day at School by Ama Ata Aidoo

  • The protagonist reflects on the morning assembly and foreign history lessons
  • Mr. Phillip leaves the class, granting the students some freedom to talk
  • Little Kofi challenges the protagonist to a swimming contest
  • The protagonist and Ebo discuss the upcoming swimming race and find a taami tree
  • The boys spy on the girls by the river and are discovered by Ama
  • A conversation ensues between the boys and Ama, who questions their presence
  • Ama and the boys talk about the swimming race and the protagonist's reason for challenging Little Kofi
  • Ama expresses concern about the protagonist's brother and shares a cultural practice
  • The boys catch a fish in the river and engage in a swimming competition
  • The protagonist wins the swimming competition and teases Ebo
  • The boys imitate Mr. Phillip's foreign language and have a lighthearted moment
  • The story ends with an exchange about speaking English like a goat and the quality of the Queen's English

The Bridge from Boy to Man

  • Nana Mosi believes rivers are sacred spaces where ancestors dwell to assist during times of need
  • A boy searches for his brother, Ebo, who is missing
  • The boy reminisces about a time after school with Ebo and Ama at the river
  • Suddenly, gunshots ring out, and the boy runs through the woods in fear
  • In the dark, the boy realizes this is not a dream and finds himself in big trouble
  • The story of the initiation is described as a transition from boy to manhood
  • The initiation involves shaving hair, marking the body with symbols, and enduring harsh trials
  • The boy is captured and taken to a gated village during a storm
  • He is held captive by a tall, shadowy figure with a machete
  • The text is filled with suspense and a sense of impending danger
  • The narrative delves into themes of tradition, identity, and coming of age
  • The story is set in a village with a strong connection to nature and ancestral beliefs

"The Transaction" - Summary

  • War Horn and Crocodile bring captives to a castle, negotiating with red-coated men for trade.
  • The red coats demand a high price for the captives, offering only half of what was requested.
  • The red coats examine and torture the captives, branding them with red-hot irons.
  • The captives are doused with palm oil and measured before being separated and thrown into a dungeon.
  • The dungeon is described as pitch-black, reeking of human waste, and filled with other desperate captives.
  • The protagonist experiences dizziness and hallucinations in the dungeon.
  • The protagonist has a dream about a slaughtered bull and a conversation with a dark lady.
  • The dark lady reassures the protagonist and warns against making noise.
  • The protagonist reflects on the red coats bringing misery and destruction to those who do not resemble them.
  • The captives are dehumanized and mistreated, highlighting the brutality of the situation.
  • The text conveys a sense of despair, fear, and helplessness experienced by the captives.
  • The narrative portrays the exploitation, cruelty, and injustice faced by the captives at the hands of the red coats.

Escape from Captivity and a Daring Act of Defiance

  • Kofi and Afua are held captive on a ship, witnessing the mistreatment and death of their fellow captives.
  • Afua reveals hope to Kofi, hinting at a potential revolt among the captives and encouraging Kofi to believe in his freedom.
  • Afua stages a mutiny, using a dagger to hold a captor at bay before ultimately choosing to jump overboard.
  • Kofi grapples with the loss of hope and dreams, feeling utterly alone and desolate.
  • Kofi reflects on the passage of time and the emotional toll of the captivity on himself and his fellow captives.
  • The ship is caught in a violent storm, leading to chaos and destruction.
  • The ship ultimately wrecks, with Kofi and the captives facing the wrath of the raging sea.
  • The text portrays the sea as a relentless and destructive force, overpowering the ship and its inhabitants.

Acknowledgments and Twi Glossary Summary

  • The author expresses gratitude to numerous individuals, including their agent, writing assistant, friends, lawyers, former colleagues, and publishing professionals, for their support and inspiration throughout their writing journey.
  • The author also acknowledges the American School in London for providing a residency that allowed them time and creative space to work on their book.
  • The author thanks their editor, Margaret Raymo, and other professionals at Little, Brown Books for Young Readers for their contributions to sharing the story with the world.
  • The book, "The Door of No Return," is described as the saga of an African family, and the author dedicates it to their loved ones, particularly their daughter and family members.
  • The author provides a glossary of Twi words and phrases, explaining their meanings and cultural significance.
  • The Twi language is spoken by the Akan people in southern Ghana, with the Asante people being a part of the Akan and speaking Twi.
  • The Twi alphabet consists of twenty-two letters, including two unique letters, ɛ and ɔ, not found in the English alphabet.
  • The glossary includes translations and explanations of various Twi words, such as "aboa" (animal), "akwaaba" (welcome), "kenkey" (West African dish), and "nana" (gender-neutral title representing the highest office in society).
  • The author shares personal connections to some of the glossary entries, such as childhood memories of singing a Ghanaian children's song with their mother and abbreviating a phrase to signify bravery.
  • Through the glossary, the author provides insights into Ghanaian culture and traditions, including the significance of certain words, greetings, and traditional garments like kente cloth.
  • The glossary also includes explanations of cultural practices, such as the historical use of cowrie shells as currency in Africa and the significance of the Benda as a unit of weight for measuring gold dust among the Asante people.
  • Overall, the acknowledgments and Twi glossary provide a glimpse into the author's personal and cultural influences, as well as the support network that contributed to the creation of their book.

Description

Test your knowledge on African village narratives that explore themes of cultural clash, tradition, friendship, and resilience through stories of protagonists facing challenges and hardships in their community.

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