Social Psychology Quiz: Conformity, Group Dynamics, and Obedience

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69 Questions

What are the key characteristics when forming first impressions?

Which factor influences overall perception by presenting information first?

What is the term for applying the schema of someone known to understand someone new?

Why are first impressions not accurate according to the text?

According to Freud's theory, which part of personality represents immediate gratification?

During which stage of Freud's psychosocial development do conflicts such as the Oedipus and Electra complexes occur?

Which Neo-Freudian theorist emphasized the need for security in childhood?

According to Freud, what does the preconscious mind contain?

According to Freud, what are the three levels of awareness in his theory?

Which part of personality represents morality according to Freud's theory?

What is normative social influence?

What is social facilitation?

What is social loafing?

What was the focus of the Milgram Studies?

What did the Burger Study replicate from the Milgram study?

What is instrumental aggression?

What characterizes hostile aggression?

What do theories of aggression consider?

What influences neural influences on aggression?

What environmental factors can influence aggression?

What characterizes prosocial behavior?

According to attachment theory, why do infants develop strong emotional bonds with caretakers?

What does attribution theory explain?

What is the impact of self-serving bias and fundamental attribution error?

In which type of society are situational factors often overlooked in favor of internal factors?

How are stereotypes perpetuated?

What can social categorization lead to?

What are the two forms in which racism can manifest?

What did the Robber's Cave Study demonstrate?

What does social identity theory explain?

What are the two types of attitudes mentioned?

What does cognitive dissonance theory explain?

What is the tendency to remember information encountered first and how it influences overall perception called?

What is the term for the strategies used to influence impressions such as self-promotion, ingratiation, exemplification, intimidation, and supplication?

What is the tendency to overestimate the commonality between oneself and other people called?

Why are first impressions not accurate according to the text?

What does the Robber's Cave Study demonstrate?

What is the impact of self-serving bias and fundamental attribution error?

What does social identity theory explain?

What does cognitive dissonance theory explain?

How do individualistic societies tend to perceive situational factors?

What characterizes overt racism?

What is the focus of informational social influence?

What is the characteristic effect of social categorization?

What are stereotypes learned and perpetuated from?

What characterizes symbolic racism?

What is the focus of central route persuasion?

What is the main difference between social facilitation and social loafing?

What characterizes normative social influence?

What was the key finding of the Burger Study that replicated the Milgram study?

What distinguishes instrumental aggression from hostile aggression?

What are the neural influences on aggression according to the text?

What characterizes prosocial behavior?

According to Freud's theory, what is the id responsible for?

Which Neo-Freudian theorist emphasized the concept of collective unconscious and archetypes?

What did Karen Horney identify as three neurotic personality patterns?

According to Freud's psychosocial stages of personality development, what concept is associated with erogenous zones and fixation?

What did Alfred Adler's "striving for superiority" refer to?

In Freud's theory, what does the preconscious mind contain?

What part of personality does the superego represent according to Freud's theory?

What did Maslow's humanistic theories emphasize?

Which personality disorder is characterized by extreme social avoidance, introversion, and loneliness?

Which personality disorder is associated with a pervasive detachment from social relationships and a preference for solitary activities?

Which personality disorder is characterized by instability of emotions, relationships, and identity?

Which personality disorder is associated with excessive attention-seeking behavior and dramatic emotional displays?

Which personality disorder is characterized by extreme need to be taken care of, clingy behavior, and constant helplessness?

"Grandiosity" and "lack of empathy" are key characteristics of which personality disorder?

Which personality disorder is associated with excessive concern for order and control, preoccupation with rules, and rigid stubbornness?

Which personality disorder is characterized by recurrent suicidal behaviors, unstable emotions, and impulsive behavior?

Summary

Social Psychology Overview

  • Attribution theory explains how people attribute the cause of experiences and behaviors to internal or external factors.
  • Self-serving bias and fundamental attribution error affect how individuals perceive and attribute the causes of actions.
  • Individualistic societies tend to overlook situational factors in favor of internal factors, while collectivistic societies are more sensitive to situational factors.
  • Stereotypes are learned and perpetuated from one's environment and can lead to prejudice and discrimination.
  • Social categorization simplifies the environment but can lead to in-group favoritism and out-group derogation.
  • Racism can manifest as overt or symbolic racism, with the latter being indirect forms of discrimination.
  • The Robber's Cave Study demonstrated the impact of competition and contact hypothesis on reducing stereotypes.
  • Social identity theory explains in-group favoritism and out-group derogation.
  • Attitudes can be explicit or implicit, and persuasion can occur through central or peripheral routes.
  • Cognitive dissonance theory explains the conflict between actions and attitudes, leading to post-decision dissonance.
  • Social influence and social norms shape behaviors and preferences, leading to conformity and obedience.
  • Informational social influence leads individuals to conform based on the desire to behave correctly or gain an understanding of the world.

Freudian Theory and Neo-Freudian Theories of Personality

  • Freud's theory includes three levels of awareness: conscious mind, preconscious mind, and unconscious mind
  • The conscious mind is what a person is presently aware of, while the preconscious mind contains memories that can be accessed and the unconscious mind contains repressed thoughts and motivations
  • The id, ego, and superego are the three parts of personality, with the id representing immediate gratification, the ego representing reality, and the superego representing morality
  • Unhealthy personalities develop when there is an imbalance between the id, ego, and superego
  • Freud's psychosocial stages of personality development include erogenous zones and the concept of fixation
  • The anal-retentive and anal-expulsive personalities develop during toilet training based on the child's reaction to the training
  • Conflicts during the phallic stage include the Oedipus and Electra conflicts
  • Neo-Freudian theories include Carl Jung's collective unconscious and archetypes, Alfred Adler's "striving for superiority," and Karen Horney's focus on the need for security
  • Adler's "striving for superiority" refers to overcoming feelings of inferiority, while Horney's work emphasizes the need for security in childhood
  • Horney identified three neurotic personality patterns: moving toward people, moving against people, and moving away from people
  • Humanistic theories emphasize conscious free will and personal growth, developed in the 1960s by Maslow
  • Maslow studied the lives of healthy and creative individuals to form his humanistic approach

Description

Test your knowledge on social psychology concepts such as normative social influence, social facilitation, social loafing, and the Milgram Studies. Explore how individuals behave in group settings and the impact of authority figures on obedience.

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