Nursing Diagnosis and The Nursing Process Quiz

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100 Questions

What is the purpose of a Nursing Diagnosis?

To ensure best patient care and outcome

When does interprofessional education occur?

When students from two or more professions learn from and with each other

What is the primary goal of interprofessional education?

To improve health outcomes

Which of the following is NOT included in the Five Steps of the Nursing Process?

Physical therapy plan

What type of data is collected during the Assessment step of the Nursing Process?

Over the counter medications

What is the role of a diagnosis in patient care?

To create a problem statement for each patient

What year was Interprofessional Education Collaboration formed?

2009

What does Compliance and adherence refer to in the context of nursing?

Taking medications as prescribed and following medical advice

What component goes into diagnosing a patient?

A problem statement, as evidenced by and related to.

What is the primary organ responsible for drug metabolism?

Liver

Which of the following is NOT part of the 'Rights' of Medication administration?

Right medication color

What is the study of how various drug forms influence the way in which the drug affects the body?

Pharmaceutics

What is the term used for the dissolving of solid dosage forms and their absorption?

Absorption

Which study focuses on what happens to a drug from the time it is put into the body until it has been eliminated?

Pharmacokinetics

Drug-receptor interaction typically involves the joining of a drug molecule with a reactive site on which of the following?

Cell membrane

Which field focuses on the clinical use of drugs to prevent and treat diseases?

Pharmacotherapeutics

What does the term 'Half Life' refer to in pharmacokinetics?

The time required for half of a given drug to be removed from the body

When are most drugs considered effectively removed from the body?

After approximately five half-lives

What is the term used to describe the highest blood level of a drug?

Peak Level

Which type of therapy involves intensive treatment for acutely ill patients, often needed to sustain life or treat disease?

Acute therapy

What is the goal of palliative therapy in patient care?

To provide relief from symptoms and improve quality of life

What is the term for the physiologic or psychological need for a drug?

Dependence

'Synergistic effects' between drugs mean:

(1+1>2)

'Cumulative effects' of a medication occur when:

Several successive doses of a medication are administered

'Prophylactic/Empirical therapy' aims to:

Prevent illness or other undesirable outcomes during planned events

'Adverse effects' of drugs refer to:

'Unintended effects that are a direct response to one or more drugs'

What is the primary focus of Pharmacodynamics?

What the drug does to the body

Which organ is primarily responsible for drug excretion from the body?

Kidney

What is the main purpose of Clinical Toxicology?

To provide care to poisoned patients

Which process involves the transport of a drug by the bloodstream to its site of action?

Distribution

What does Pharmacotherapeutics mainly focus on?

The intended purpose of a medication

Which study area examines how various drug forms influence drug effects on the body?

Pharmaceutics

In what way do drugs exert their actions in the body according to Pharmacodynamics?

Through receptors, enzymes, and non-selective interactions

What is the main outcome criteria for drug therapy in nursing practice?

Safe and effective administration of medications

What is the main goal of the Nursing Process?

To ensure best patient care and outcome

What is the primary purpose of Interprofessional Education Collaboration?

To develop core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice

What is the primary focus of a Nursing Diagnosis?

Identifying problems for individualized patient care

In the context of nursing, what is the main aim of Assessment during the Nursing Process?

Collecting data for analysis

What is the significance of developing core competencies in interprofessional education?

Improving patient safety

Why is critical thinking emphasized in the Nursing Process?

To ensure thorough and evolving patient care

How does Interprofessional Education differ from traditional education?

It involves learning from and with students from multiple professions.

Why is it important to consider a patient's medication profile during assessment?

To ensure compliance with prescriptions

What is the primary goal of palliative therapy in patient care?

To provide comfort and relief from symptoms

What is the term used to describe the need for a drug to avoid physical withdrawal symptoms?

Physical dependence

What do cumulative effects of a medication result from?

Rapid absorption faster than excretion or metabolism

Which type of therapy supplies the body with a substance needed to maintain normal function?

Supplemental therapy

What is the ratio between toxic and therapeutic concentrations of a drug called?

Therapeutic index

Which term describes the physiologic or psychological need for a drug to avoid physical withdrawal symptoms?

Physical dependence

The highest blood level of a drug is known as what?

Peak Level

What do additive effects between drugs mean?

The combined effect is greater than the sum of individual effects

What defines the cellular processes that change in response to the presence of drug molecules?

Pharmacodynamics

Interprofessional education occurs when students from two or more professions learn with each other.

True

In Nursing Diagnosis, a nurse makes a problem statement to ensure the best patient care.

True

The Nursing Process is a one-time event rather than an ongoing process.

False

Interprofessional Education Collaboration was formed in 2009.

True

Assessment in the Nursing Process involves reviewing medication profiles and drug use.

True

Diagnosis in the Nursing Process focuses on physical examinations only.

False

The goal of Interprofessional Education Collaboration is to develop core competencies for independent practice.

False

Critical thinking is not emphasized in the Nursing Process.

False

Drug-receptor interaction involves the joining of a drug molecule with a reactive site on the surface of a cell or tissue.

True

Pharmacodynamics is the study of what the body does to drugs.

False

Pharmaceutics is the study of how various drug forms influence the way in which drugs affect the body.

True

The liver is the primary organ responsible for drug excretion from the body.

False

Pharmacogenomics focuses on how drugs change a person's RNA.

False

Pharmacognosy deals with the source of all early drugs being derived from synthetic sources.

False

The study of toxicology examines the beneficial effects of drugs on living organisms.

False

Pharmacokinetics involves studying what happens to a drug from the time it is eliminated until it enters the body.

False

Half-life measures the rate at which a drug is absorbed into the body.

False

Most drugs are considered effectively removed from the body after approximately five half-lives.

True

Palliative therapy focuses on curing the disease rather than providing relief from symptoms.

False

Tolerance refers to an increasing response to repeated drug use.

False

Physical dependence is a psychological need for a drug to avoid physical withdrawal symptoms.

False

Additive effects between drugs mean that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their individual effects.

True

Synergistic effects between drugs mean that their combined effect is equal to the sum of their individual effects.

False

Prophylactic/empirical therapy aims to treat illness after it has occurred.

False

Drug concentration refers to the length of time a drug remains in the body to elicit a response.

False

Match the drug effect with its description:

Peak Level = Highest blood level of a drug Trough Level = Lowest blood level of a drug Toxicity = Occurs if the peak blood level of the drug is too high Therapeutic Index = Ratio between the toxic and therapeutic concentrations of a drug

Match the therapy type with its description:

Maintenance Therapy = Used for chronic illnesses such as hypertension Supplemental Therapy = Supplies the body with a substance needed to maintain normal function Palliative Therapy = Focuses on making the patient as comfortable as possible Supportive Therapy = Maintains body functions while the patient is recovering from illness or trauma

Match the patient condition with its description:

Tolerance = Decreasing response to repeated drug use Dependence = Physiologic or psychological need for a drug Physical Dependence = Physiologic need for a drug to avoid physical withdrawal symptoms Psychological Dependence = Obsessive desire for the euphoric effects of a drug

Match the drug interaction effect with its meaning:

Additive Effects = (1+1=2) Synergistic Effects = (1+1>2) Antagonistic Effects = (1+1=1) Cumulative Effects = Occurs when several successive doses of a medication are administered or when absorption occurs faster than excretion

Match the therapy purpose with its description:

Prophylactic/Empirical Therapy = Provided to prevent illness or other undesirable outcomes during planned events Palliative Therapy = Goal is to make the patient as comfortable as possible in end stages of an illness Maintenance Therapy = Used for chronic illnesses like hypertension Supportive Therapy = Maintains integrity of body functions during recovery from illness or trauma

Match the following components of the Nursing Process with their descriptions:

Assessment = Data collection, review, and analysis Diagnosis = A problem statement, as evidenced by and related to Planning = Development of a plan of action to address patient needs Implementation = Execution of the established plan of care

Match the following terms related to drug therapy with their definitions:

Half-life = Time for the drug concentration to reduce by half in the body Tolerance = Increasing response to repeated drug use Cumulative effects = Resulting from repeated drug doses building up in the body Adverse effects = Undesirable effects from drug therapy

Match the following concepts with their descriptions in Pharmacokinetics:

Absorption = Process of a drug entering the bloodstream Distribution = Movement of a drug throughout the body Metabolism = Body's process of changing a drug into a usable form Excretion = Elimination of drugs from the body

Match the following terms with their meanings in Pharmacodynamics:

Drug-receptor interaction = Joining of a drug molecule with a reactive site on cells or tissues Therapeutic index = Ratio between toxic and therapeutic concentrations of a drug Synergistic effects = Combined effect greater than sum of individual effects Additive effects = Combined effect equal to sum of individual effects

Match the following education-related terms with their objectives:

Interprofessional education collaboration = Develop core competencies for collaborative practice Interpersonal education collaboration = Students from different professions learn together Goal of interprofessional education = Improve health outcomes through collaboration Formation of Interprofessional Education Collaboration = Year 2009

Match the drug classification with its description:

Beta blocker = Structure Antibiotic = Therapeutic use Antidepressant = Therapeutic use NSAID = Therapeutic use

Match the pharmacokinetics term with its definition:

Absorption = The movement of a drug from its site of administration into the bloodstream for distribution to the tissues Distribution = Refers to the transport of a drug by the bloodstream to its site of action Metabolism = The process where drugs are chemically changed in the body Excretion = The elimination of drugs from the body

Match the drug-receptor relationship term with its explanation:

Drug-receptor interaction = Joining of a drug molecule with a reactive site on the surface of a cell or tissue Enzyme action = Drug activity involving specific biological catalysts Non-selective interactions = Drug actions that are not specific to certain receptors Pharmacogenomics = Study of drugs altering a person's DNA

Match the pharmacotherapy term with its meaning:

Pharmacognosy = Source of early drugs from nature and study of natural drug sources Pharmacodynamics = Study of what the drug does to the body Pharmacotherapeutics = Clinical use of drugs to prevent and treat diseases Toxicology = Science of the adverse effects of drugs on living organisms

Match the toxicology term with its focus:

Clinical toxicology = Care specifically for poisoned patients Toxicology = Study of adverse effects of drugs and chemicals on living organisms Pharmacokinetics = Study of what happens to a drug in the body Pharmacodynamics = Study of what drug does to the body

Match the following terms related to the Nursing Process with their descriptions:

Assessment = Data collection, review, and analysis Diagnosis = A problem statement, as evidenced by and related to Planning = Developing a plan of action for patient care Implementation = Putting the care plan into action

Match the following terms related to Medication with their meanings:

Medication profile = All drug use including prescriptions, over the counter medications, etc. Allergies = Specific reactions to certain substances Compliance and adherence = Following prescribed treatment plans Over the counter medications = Medications that can be purchased without a prescription

Match the following terms related to Interprofessional Education Collaboration with their explanations:

Formation year of Interprofessional Education Collaboration = 2009 Goal of Interprofessional Education Collaboration = Develop core competencies for collaborative practice Definition of Interprofessional education = When students from multiple professions learn from and with each other Objective of forming Interprofessional Education Collaboration = Developing core competencies for collaborative practice

Match the following terms related to Drug Therapy with their definitions:

Synergistic effects = Combined effect greater than sum of individual effects Adverse effects = Undesirable effects of drugs Cumulative effects = Effects that build up over time Therapeutic concentrations = Optimal levels in the body for desired effect

Match the following terms related to Pharmacokinetics with their explanations:

Half-life = Rate at which a drug is absorbed into the body Transport via bloodstream to site of action = Process involving drug transport to its intended site Highest blood level of a drug = Peak concentration in the bloodstream Toxicological ratio = Ratio between toxic and therapeutic concentrations of a drug

Match the pharmacologic principle with its description:

Pharmacokinetics = Study of what happens to a drug from the time it is put into the body until it leaves Pharmacodynamics = Study of what the drug does to the body Pharmaceutics = Study of how drug forms influence drug effects on the body Pharmacogenomics = Study of drugs changing a person's DNA

Match the pharmacologic classification with its definition:

Drug-receptor relationships = Joining of drug molecule with reactive site on cell or tissue Mechanism of action = How drugs produce therapeutic effects in different ways Therapeutic use = Classification based on purpose the drug serves Structure = Classifying drugs based on their chemical makeup

Match the drug administration term with its meaning:

First Pass Effect = Large proportion of a drug changed into inactive metabolites by the liver Excretion = The elimination of drugs from the body primarily by the kidney Distribution = Transport of a drug by bloodstream to its site of action Absorption = Movement of a drug from administration site into the bloodstream

Match the medication safety term with its explanation:

Medication Errors = Preventable events causing inappropriate medication use or patient harm Toxicology = Science studying adverse effects of drugs and chemicals on living organisms Clinical toxicology = Specific care for poisoned patients based on priority system Poison control centers = Facilities providing treatment for poisoned individuals

Study Notes

Nursing Process

  • The Nursing Process is a research-supported organizational framework for professional nursing practice.
  • It ensures the delivery of thorough, individualized, and quality nursing care to patients.
  • The process requires critical thinking and is an ongoing and constantly evolving process.

Five Steps of the Nursing Process

  • Assessment: Data collection, review, and analysis of medication profile, including all drug use, prescriptions, allergies, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, herbs, and supplements.
  • Diagnosis: A problem statement, as evidenced by and related to, which involves diagnosing a patient.
  • Planning: Identification of goals and outcome criteria, with specific goals being objective, measurable, and relatable with an established time period for achievement.
  • Implementation: Initiation and completion of specific nursing actions as defined by the human needs statement, goals, and outcome criteria.
  • Evaluation: Ongoing part of the nursing process, determining the status of the goals and outcomes of care, monitoring the patient's response to drug therapy, and expected and unexpected outcomes.

The "Rights" of Medication

  • Right drug: Ensuring the correct medication is administered.
  • Right dose: Ensuring the correct dose of medication is administered.
  • Right time: Ensuring medication is administered at the correct time.
  • Right route: Ensuring medication is administered through the correct route.
  • Right patient: Ensuring the correct patient receives the medication.
  • Right documentation: Ensuring accurate and complete documentation of medication administration.
  • Right reason or indication: Ensuring medication is administered for the correct reason or indication.
  • Right response: Ensuring the patient's response to medication is monitored and evaluated.
  • Right to refuse: Ensuring the patient's right to refuse medication is respected.

Medication Errors

  • Medication errors are any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm.
  • Errors can be patient-related or system-related.

Drug Classification

  • Drugs are grouped together based on similar properties, such as structure or therapeutic use.
  • Examples of drug classifications include beta blockers and antibiotics.

Pharmacologic Principles

  • Pharmaceutics: The study of how various drug forms influence the way in which the drug affects the body.
  • Pharmacokinetics: The study of what happens to a drug from the time it is put into the body until the parent drug and all metabolites have left the body.
  • Pharmacodynamics: The study of what the drug does to the body.
  • Pharmacogenomics: The study of drugs changing a person's DNA.

Pharmacotherapeutics

  • The clinical use of drugs to prevent and treat diseases.
  • Defines principles of drug actions, including the cellular processes that change in response to the presence of drug molecules.
  • Drugs are organized into pharmacologic classes.

Types of Therapy

  • Acute therapy: Involves intensive therapy drug treatment and is implemented in the acutely ill or critically ill.
  • Maintenance therapy: Used for the treatment of chronic illnesses.
  • Supplemental therapy: Also known as replacement therapy, supplies the body with a substance needed to maintain normal function.
  • Palliative therapy: Focuses on providing patients with relief from the symptoms of pain and stress of a serious illness.
  • Supportive therapy: Maintains the integrity of body functions while the patient is recovering from illness or trauma.
  • Prophylactic/empirical therapy: Provided to prevent illness or other undesirable outcome during planned events.

Monitoring

  • Evaluating the clinical response requires familiarity with both the drug's intended therapeutic action and its unintended effects.
  • Therapeutic action: The desired effect of a drug, such as reduced blood pressure following administration of antihypertensive drugs.
  • Adverse effects: Undesirable effects that are a direct response to one or more drugs.
  • Cumulative effects: An effect that occurs when several successive doses of a medication are administered or when absorption of a medication occurs faster than excretion or metabolism.
  • Therapeutic index: The ratio between the toxic and therapeutic concentrations of a drug.
  • Drug concentration: The length of time the concentration of a drug in the blood or tissues is sufficient to elicit a response.
  • Patient conditions: How the patient is responding to the medication.

Drug Interactions

  • Additive effects: The combined effect of two or more drugs is equal to the sum of their individual effects.
  • Synergistic effects: The combined effect of two or more drugs is greater than the sum of their individual effects.
  • Antagonistic effects: The combined effect of two or more drugs is less than the sum of their individual effects.### Nursing Process
  • The five steps of the nursing process:
    • Assessment: Data collection, review, and analysis
    • Diagnosis: A problem statement, as evidenced by and related to
    • Planning: Identification of goals and outcome criteria
    • Implementation: Initiation and completion of specific nursing actions
    • Evaluation: Ongoing part of the nursing process, determining the status of goals and outcomes of care

Medication Administration

  • The "Rights" of Medication:
    • Right drug
    • Right dose
    • Right Time
    • Right route
    • Right patient
    • Right documentation
    • Right reason or indication
    • Right response
    • Right to refuse
  • Medication Errors: Any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm

Pharmacology

  • Drug Classification: Drugs are grouped together based on similar properties, such as:
    • Structure (e.g., Beta blocker)
    • Therapeutic use (e.g., Antibiotic)
  • Pharmacokinetics: The study of what happens to a drug from the time it is put into the body until the parent drug and all metabolites have left the body
    • Absorption: The movement of a drug from its site of administration into the bloodstream for distribution to the tissues
    • Distribution: The transport of a drug by the bloodstream to its site of action
    • Metabolism: The organ most responsible for the metabolism of drugs is the liver
    • Excretion: The elimination of drugs from the body, primarily by the kidney
  • Pharmacodynamics: The study of what the drug does to the body
    • Mechanism of action: Drugs can produce actions in several ways, including through receptors, enzymes, and non-selective interactions
    • Drug-receptor relationships: The joining of the drug molecule with a reactive site on the surface of a cell or tissue

Pharmacotherapeutics

  • Types of therapy:
    • Acute therapy: Involves intensive therapy for the acutely ill or critically ill
    • Maintenance therapy: Used for the treatment of chronic illnesses
    • Supplemental therapy: Also known as replacement therapy, supplies the body with a substance needed to maintain normal function
    • Palliative therapy: Focuses on providing patients with relief from symptoms and improving quality of life
    • Supportive therapy: Maintains the integrity of body functions while the patient is recovering from illness or trauma
    • Prophylactic/Empirical therapy: Provided to prevent illness or other undesirable outcomes during planned events

Interprofessional Education Collaboration

  • Formed in 2009, with the objective of developing core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice
  • Interprofessional education occurs when students from two or more professions learn from and with each other
  • Goal: Improve health outcomes### Nursing Process
  • Planning: identification of goals and outcome criteria
  • Goals: objective, measurable, and relatable with an established time period for achievement of outcomes
  • Outcome criteria: concrete descriptions of patient goals and expectations for behavior
  • Implementation: initiation and completion of specific nursing actions as defined by the Human needs statement (Nursing diagnosis), goals, and outcome criteria
  • Evaluation: ongoing part of the nursing process, determining the status of goals and outcomes of care, and monitoring the patient's response to drug therapy

Medication Administration

  • "Rights" of Medication:
    • Right drug
    • Right dose
    • Right time
    • Right route
    • Right patient
    • Right documentation
    • Right reason or indication
    • Right response
    • Right to refuse
  • Medication Errors: any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm

Drug Classification

  • Drugs are grouped together based on similar properties
  • Classifications:
    • Structure (e.g., Beta blocker)
    • Therapeutic use (e.g., Antibiotic)

Pharmacologic Principles

  • Pharmaceutics: the study of how various drug forms influence the way in which the drug affects the body
  • Pharmacokinetics:
    • Absorption: the movement of a drug from its site of administration into the bloodstream for distribution to the tissues
    • Distribution: refers to the transport of a drug by the bloodstream to its site of action
    • Metabolism: the organ most responsible for the metabolism of drugs is the liver
    • Excretion: the elimination of drugs from the body, primarily by the kidneys
  • Pharmacodynamics:
    • Mechanism of action: drugs can produce actions (therapeutic affects) in several ways
    • Drug-receptor relationships: the joining of the drug molecule with a reactive site on the surface of a cell or tissue
  • Pharmacogenomics: the study of how drugs change a person's DNA
  • Pharmacotherapeutics: the clinical use of drugs to prevent and treat diseases

Pharmacokinetic Concepts

  • First Pass Effect: a large proportion of a drug that is chemically changed into inactive metabolites by the liver
  • Half-Life: the time required for half of a given drug to be removed from the body
  • Steady State: a physiologic state in which the amount of drug removed via elimination is equal to the amount of drug absorbed with each dose
  • Peak Level: the highest blood level of a drug
  • Trough Level: the lowest blood level of a drug
  • Toxicity: occurs if the peak blood level of the drug is too high

Therapeutic Applications

  • Acute therapy: intensive therapy drug treatment, often needed to sustain life or treat disease
  • Maintenance therapy: used for the treatment of chronic illnesses
  • Supplemental therapy: supplies the body with a substance needed to maintain normal function
  • Palliative therapy: focuses on providing patients with relief from symptoms and improving quality of life
  • Supportive therapy: maintains the integrity of body functions while the patient is recovering from illness or trauma
  • Prophylactic/Empirical therapy: a drug therapy provided to prevent illness or other undesirable outcome during planned events

Monitoring and Drug Interactions

  • Monitoring: evaluating the clinical response requires familiarity with both the drug's intended therapeutic action and its unintended effects
  • Therapeutic action: the desired response to a drug
  • Adverse effects: undesirable effects that are a direct response to one or more drugs
  • Cumulative effects: an effect that occurs when several successive doses of a medication are administered or when absorption of a medication occurs faster than excretion or metabolism
  • Therapeutic index: the ratio between the toxic and therapeutic concentrations of a drug
  • Drug interactions:
    • Additive effects
    • Synergistic effects
    • Antagonistic effects

Test your knowledge on nursing diagnosis and the nursing process. This quiz covers topics such as converting measurements, understanding nursing diagnoses, and applying the nursing process for quality patient care.

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