Life Span Development Quiz

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By DexterousLapisLazuli5465

Quiz

Flashcards

39 Questions

What are the three major issues that developmental psychology focuses on?

According to Piaget’s theory, what is the first stage of cognitive development in childhood?

What are some of the characteristics of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)?

At what age does self-awareness begin to emerge?

What is the struggle of adolescence according to Erikson's theory?

At what age is emerging adulthood typically experienced?

What is the relationship between work and self-definition in adulthood?

What are some of the characteristics of physical development in adulthood?

Piaget's theory of cognitive development involves four universal, irreversible stages from simple reflexes to adult abstract reasoning.

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have social deficiencies and repetitive behaviors, but their theory of mind is not impaired.

Self-awareness begins to emerge in children at around 2 years old.

Authoritative parenting is associated with children who have higher self-esteem and self-reliance.

The struggle of identity versus role confusion is a key developmental issue in adulthood.

Adulthood physical development is characterized by peak physical vigor in mid-twenties and gradual physical decline.

Memory declines uniformly across all types of information in late adulthood.

Adult commitments can include work, marriage, and divorce.

What are the four stages of Piaget's theory of cognitive development?

What are the three main characteristics of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)?

When does self-awareness begin to emerge in infants?

Which parenting style is associated with children having the highest self-esteem, self-reliance, and social competence?

What is the struggle of adolescence according to Erikson's theory?

What is emerging adulthood characterized by?

What is the pattern of memory decline in adulthood?

  • Developmental psychology focuses on major issues of ______ and nurture, continuity and stages, and stability and change.

  • Cognitive development in childhood, according to Piaget’s theory, involves universal, irreversible stages from simple reflexes to adult abstract reasoning, building schemas through ______ and accommodation.

  • Piaget’s stages include the sensorimotor stage (birth to 2 years), preoperational stage (2 to 7 years), concrete operational stage (7 to 11 years), and ______ operational stage (12 years to adulthood).

  • Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have impaired theory of mind, social deficiencies, and repetitive behaviors, attributed to poor communication among brain regions and ______ influences.

  • Self-concept emerges gradually, with self-awareness beginning at 6 months and more detailed descriptions of gender, group membership, and psychological traits in ______ age.

  • Parenting styles reflect varying degrees of control, with ______ parenting associated with children with the highest self-esteem, self-reliance, and social competence.

  • Emerging adulthood, from 18 to mid-twenties, is characterized by not yet assuming adult responsibilities and independence and feelings of being “in ______”.

  • Adult commitments include work as a source of competence, accomplishment, and self-definition, as well as marriage and divorce rates related to shared interests and values, self-disclosure, and women’s increased ability to ______ themselves.

What is the name of Lawrence Kohlberg's theory of moral development?

What is the name of Jean Piaget's cognitive development theory?

What is the name of the most common age-related dementia?

What is the name of the theory that includes problem-solving, understanding language, and developing morals in cognitive development?

What are Jean Piaget's stages of cognitive development?

What is Lawrence Kohlberg's theory of moral reasoning?

What is the most effective way to slow the aging process according to the text?

What is the difference between concrete operational and formal operational stages of cognitive development?

Summary

Development Through the Life Span: Key Issues and Stages

  • Developmental psychology focuses on major issues of nature and nurture, continuity and stages, and stability and change.
  • In infancy and childhood, physical development includes brain cell sculpting, rapid frontal lobe growth, and motor skill development guided by genes and environment.
  • Cognitive development in childhood, according to Piaget’s theory, involves universal, irreversible stages from simple reflexes to adult abstract reasoning, building schemas through assimilation and accommodation.
  • Piaget’s stages include the sensorimotor stage (birth to 2 years), preoperational stage (2 to 7 years), concrete operational stage (7 to 11 years), and formal operational stage (12 years to adulthood).
  • Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have impaired theory of mind, social deficiencies, and repetitive behaviors, attributed to poor communication among brain regions and genetic influences.
  • Self-concept emerges gradually, with self-awareness beginning at 6 months and more detailed descriptions of gender, group membership, and psychological traits in school age.
  • Parenting styles reflect varying degrees of control, with authoritative parenting associated with children with the highest self-esteem, self-reliance, and social competence.
  • Adolescence involves physical, cognitive, social, and parent/peer relationship development, with the struggle of identity versus role confusion and social identity formation.
  • Emerging adulthood, from 18 to mid-twenties, is characterized by not yet assuming adult responsibilities and independence and feelings of being “in between”.
  • Adulthood physical development includes peak physical vigor in mid-twenties, gradual physical decline, and neural processing lag in late adulthood.
  • Aging and memory show peak learning and memory in early adulthood, greater decline in ability to recall in middle adulthood, better retention of meaningful than meaningless information in late adulthood, and terminal decline at the end of life.
  • Adult commitments include work as a source of competence, accomplishment, and self-definition, as well as marriage and divorce rates related to shared interests and values, self-disclosure, and women’s increased ability to support themselves.

Development Through the Life Span: Key Issues and Stages

  • Developmental psychology focuses on major issues of nature and nurture, continuity and stages, and stability and change.
  • In infancy and childhood, physical development includes brain cell sculpting, rapid frontal lobe growth, and motor skill development guided by genes and environment.
  • Cognitive development in childhood, according to Piaget’s theory, involves universal, irreversible stages from simple reflexes to adult abstract reasoning, building schemas through assimilation and accommodation.
  • Piaget’s stages include the sensorimotor stage (birth to 2 years), preoperational stage (2 to 7 years), concrete operational stage (7 to 11 years), and formal operational stage (12 years to adulthood).
  • Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have impaired theory of mind, social deficiencies, and repetitive behaviors, attributed to poor communication among brain regions and genetic influences.
  • Self-concept emerges gradually, with self-awareness beginning at 6 months and more detailed descriptions of gender, group membership, and psychological traits in school age.
  • Parenting styles reflect varying degrees of control, with authoritative parenting associated with children with the highest self-esteem, self-reliance, and social competence.
  • Adolescence involves physical, cognitive, social, and parent/peer relationship development, with the struggle of identity versus role confusion and social identity formation.
  • Emerging adulthood, from 18 to mid-twenties, is characterized by not yet assuming adult responsibilities and independence and feelings of being “in between”.
  • Adulthood physical development includes peak physical vigor in mid-twenties, gradual physical decline, and neural processing lag in late adulthood.
  • Aging and memory show peak learning and memory in early adulthood, greater decline in ability to recall in middle adulthood, better retention of meaningful than meaningless information in late adulthood, and terminal decline at the end of life.
  • Adult commitments include work as a source of competence, accomplishment, and self-definition, as well as marriage and divorce rates related to shared interests and values, self-disclosure, and women’s increased ability to support themselves.

Development Through the Life Span: Key Issues and Stages

  • Developmental psychology focuses on major issues of nature and nurture, continuity and stages, and stability and change.
  • In infancy and childhood, physical development includes brain cell sculpting, rapid frontal lobe growth, and motor skill development guided by genes and environment.
  • Cognitive development in childhood, according to Piaget’s theory, involves universal, irreversible stages from simple reflexes to adult abstract reasoning, building schemas through assimilation and accommodation.
  • Piaget’s stages include the sensorimotor stage (birth to 2 years), preoperational stage (2 to 7 years), concrete operational stage (7 to 11 years), and formal operational stage (12 years to adulthood).
  • Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have impaired theory of mind, social deficiencies, and repetitive behaviors, attributed to poor communication among brain regions and genetic influences.
  • Self-concept emerges gradually, with self-awareness beginning at 6 months and more detailed descriptions of gender, group membership, and psychological traits in school age.
  • Parenting styles reflect varying degrees of control, with authoritative parenting associated with children with the highest self-esteem, self-reliance, and social competence.
  • Adolescence involves physical, cognitive, social, and parent/peer relationship development, with the struggle of identity versus role confusion and social identity formation.
  • Emerging adulthood, from 18 to mid-twenties, is characterized by not yet assuming adult responsibilities and independence and feelings of being “in between”.
  • Adulthood physical development includes peak physical vigor in mid-twenties, gradual physical decline, and neural processing lag in late adulthood.
  • Aging and memory show peak learning and memory in early adulthood, greater decline in ability to recall in middle adulthood, better retention of meaningful than meaningless information in late adulthood, and terminal decline at the end of life.
  • Adult commitments include work as a source of competence, accomplishment, and self-definition, as well as marriage and divorce rates related to shared interests and values, self-disclosure, and women’s increased ability to support themselves.

Development Across the Lifespan

  • Prenatal development occurs in three stages: zygote, embryo, and fetus, with each stage having specific milestones.
  • Newborns have inborn skills, including reflexes such as rooting and sucking, and crying when hungry.
  • Teratogens are substances that can damage the developing embryo or fetus, and fetal alcohol syndrome can result from exposure to alcohol in the fetal stage.
  • Fetuses can respond to sounds, learn to recognize and adapt to them, and habituate to annoying sounds with repeated exposure.
  • Motor development is influenced by maturation in the body and cerebellum, and cognitive development includes problem-solving, understanding language, and developing morals.
  • Jean Piaget's cognitive development theory includes the concepts of schemes, assimilation, and accommodation, and his stages of cognitive development are sensorimotor, pre-operational, concrete operational, and formal operational.
  • Social development includes attachment to a caregiver, with three types of attachment being secure, insecure (anxious style), and insecure (avoidant style).
  • Adolescence is a critical time in development, with cognitive development including the ability to think hypothetically, plan goals, and think about the minds of others.
  • Lawrence Kohlberg's levels of moral reasoning are pre-conventional, conventional, and post-conventional.
  • Physical abilities peak in early adulthood, with physical vitality in middle adulthood being more a function of lifestyle than of biological decline.
  • Exercise can slow the aging process by building muscles, stimulating neurogenesis, maintaining telomeres, and improving cognition.
  • Dementia is age-related, with Alzheimer's disease being a biological condition, and managing the aging process involves biopsychosocial factors.

Description

Test your knowledge on developmental psychology with our quiz on key issues and stages of life span development! From infancy to adulthood, this quiz covers topics such as physical and cognitive development, parenting styles, identity formation, and memory in aging. Put your understanding of nature versus nurture, Piaget's theory, and the challenges of adolescence and emerging adulthood to the test. See how much you know about the factors that shape us as we grow and change throughout life.

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