Connection Power Strategies

SereneSerpentine6330 avatar
By SereneSerpentine6330

Quiz

Flashcards

89 Questions

What are the two main sources of power discussed in the text?

Which type of power is derived from the followers?

What is the potential to influence, not the actual use of power, according to the text?

What does successful managers push down the chain of command according to the text?

What are the forms of influencing mentioned in the text?

What is emphasized as important for successful negotiators in the text?

What approach does the text suggest to use when influencing?

Which types of power are mentioned in the Key Terms section of the text?

Which type of power is based on the user's position power given by the organization?

Which influencing tactic involves explaining why objective needs are met and how meeting the objective benefits the other party?

What is the appropriate type of power when employees should be rewarded for doing a good job?

Which type of power involves punishment and withholding of rewards to influence compliance?

What type of power is based on the user’s personal relationships with others?

What is connection power based on?

What is politics in an organization primarily used for?

What does networking involve in an organizational context?

What are the guidelines for developing political skills?

What does self-assessment help clarify in the networking process?

What is the one-minute self-sell used for in networking?

What does building and maintaining a network involve?

What does an in-person networking interview involve?

What is negotiating primarily about?

When are negotiations appropriate?

What is the key to the negotiation process?

What should be done once there is an agreement in negotiations?

Position power is delegated, and personal power is derived from the followers.

Money and politics have a similar use according to the text.

Networking involves building and maintaining relationships.

There are seven types of power mentioned in the text.

Networking is not important in the context of organizational influence.

Influencing should not be done ethically.

Negotiating primarily involves coercion and punishment.

Successful negotiators are not necessarily trusted negotiators.

Connection power is based on relationships with influential people and is used in job seeking or promotions.

Politics is the process of gaining and using power, functioning as an organizational medium of exchange.

Networking involves developing relationships for socializing and politicking, including creating obligations and using coalitions as an influencing tactic.

Guidelines for developing political skills include understanding organizational culture, developing good working relationships, and gaining recognition.

The networking process involves self-assessment, setting goals, creating a one-minute self-sell, developing a network, conducting networking interviews, and maintaining the network.

Self-assessment helps clarify skills and competencies, while the one-minute self-sell is an opening statement used in networking to summarize history and career plans.

Building and maintaining a network involves categorizing contacts, expanding the list, and using social media while following company policies.

In-person networking interviews involve establishing rapport, delivering a one-minute self-sell, asking prepared questions, and following up with a thank-you note and status report.

Negotiating is a process where two or more parties attempt to come to an agreement and is an essential career skill.

Negotiations are appropriate in situations without a fixed price or deal, and all parties should believe they got a good deal.

The key to the negotiation process is preparation, face-to-face interactions, understanding what is being negotiated, and putting agreements in writing.

Negotiations do not have to be a zero-sum game, and it's important to take your time and stop selling once there is an agreement.

Legitimate power is based on the user’s position power given by the organization, and is appropriate when asking someone to do something within their job scope.

Rational persuasion is a helpful influencing tactic for managers and involves explaining why objective needs are met, how meeting the objective benefits the other party, providing evidence the objective can be met, and explaining how problems/concerns will be handled.

Increasing legitimate power involves increasing management experience, exercising authority regularly, following rational persuasion guidelines, and backing up authority with rewards and punishment.

Reward power is based on the user’s ability to influence others with something of value to them and is appropriate when employees should be rewarded for doing a good job.

Guidelines for increasing reward power include gaining and maintaining control over evaluating employees’ performance, finding out what others value, and letting people know you control rewards.

Coercive power involves punishment and withholding of rewards to influence compliance and is appropriate while maintaining discipline and enforcing rules.

Guidelines for increasing coercive power include gaining authority to use punishment and withhold rewards, not making rash threats, and being persistent.

Referent power is based on the user’s personal relationships with others and is appropriate for people with weak or no position power.

Increasing referent power involves developing people skills and working on relationships with managers and peers.

Expert power is based on the user’s skill and knowledge, often using the rational persuasion influencing tactic, and is appropriate when new managers rely on employees’ expertise.

Guidelines for increasing expert power include increasing training, attending trade meetings, keeping up with the latest technology, and projecting a positive self-concept.

Information power is based on the user’s data desired by others and is appropriate when making rational persuasion or inspirational appeals. Guidelines for increasing information power include having information flow through you, knowing what is going on in the organization, and developing a network of information sources.

Power is the actual use of influence over followers.

There are five types of power mentioned in the text.

Networking process does not involve self-assessment.

Negotiation primarily involves coercion and punishment.

Networking is not important in the context of organizational influence.

Successful negotiators are trusted negotiators.

Legitimate power is based on the user’s position power given by the organization, and is appropriate when asking someone to do something within their job scope.

Influencing should not be done ethically.

Connection power is based on relationships with influential people and is used in job seeking or promotions.

Politics is the process of gaining and using power, functioning as an organizational medium of exchange.

Networking involves developing relationships for socializing and politicking, including creating obligations and using coalitions as an influencing tactic.

Guidelines for developing political skills include understanding organizational culture, developing good working relationships, and gaining recognition.

The networking process involves self-assessment, setting goals, creating a one-minute self-sell, developing a network, conducting networking interviews, and maintaining the network.

Self-assessment helps clarify skills and competencies, while the one-minute self-sell is an opening statement used in networking to summarize history and career plans.

Building and maintaining a network involves categorizing contacts, expanding the list, and using social media while following company policies.

In-person networking interviews involve establishing rapport, delivering a one-minute self-sell, asking prepared questions, and following up with a thank-you note and status report.

Negotiating is a process where two or more parties attempt to come to an agreement and is an essential career skill.

Negotiations are appropriate in situations without a fixed price or deal, and all parties should believe they got a good deal.

The key to the negotiation process is preparation, face-to-face interactions, understanding what is being negotiated, and putting agreements in writing.

Negotiations do not have to be a zero-sum game, and it's important to take your time and stop selling once there is an agreement.

Legitimate power is based on the user’s position power given by the organization, and is appropriate when asking someone to do something within their job scope.

Rational persuasion is a helpful influencing tactic for managers and involves explaining why objective needs are met, how meeting the objective benefits the other party, providing evidence the objective can be met, and explaining how problems/concerns will be handled.

Increasing legitimate power involves increasing management experience, exercising authority regularly, following rational persuasion guidelines, and backing up authority with rewards and punishment.

Reward power is based on the user’s ability to influence others with something of value to them and is appropriate when employees should be rewarded for doing a good job.

Guidelines for increasing reward power include gaining and maintaining control over evaluating employees’ performance, finding out what others value, and letting people know you control rewards.

Coercive power involves punishment and withholding of rewards to influence compliance and is appropriate while maintaining discipline and enforcing rules.

Guidelines for increasing coercive power include gaining authority to use punishment and withhold rewards, not making rash threats, and being persistent.

Referent power is based on the user’s personal relationships with others and is appropriate for people with weak or no position power.

Increasing referent power involves developing people skills and working on relationships with managers and peers.

Expert power is based on the user’s skill and knowledge, often using the rational persuasion influencing tactic, and is appropriate when new managers rely on employees’ expertise.

Guidelines for increasing expert power include increasing training, attending trade meetings, keeping up with the latest technology, and projecting a positive self-concept.

Information power is based on the user’s data desired by others and is appropriate when making rational persuasion or inspirational appeals. Guidelines for increasing information power include having information flow through you, knowing what is going on in the organization, and developing a network of information sources.

Summary

Power, Politics, and Networking in Organizations

  • Connection power is based on relationships with influential people and is used in job seeking or promotions.
  • Politics is the process of gaining and using power, functioning as an organizational medium of exchange.
  • Networking involves developing relationships for socializing and politicking, including creating obligations and using coalitions as an influencing tactic.
  • Guidelines for developing political skills include understanding organizational culture, developing good working relationships, and gaining recognition.
  • The networking process involves self-assessment, setting goals, creating a one-minute self-sell, developing a network, conducting networking interviews, and maintaining the network.
  • Self-assessment helps clarify skills and competencies, while the one-minute self-sell is an opening statement used in networking to summarize history and career plans.
  • Building and maintaining a network involves categorizing contacts, expanding the list, and using social media while following company policies.
  • In-person networking interviews involve establishing rapport, delivering a one-minute self-sell, asking prepared questions, and following up with a thank-you note and status report.
  • Negotiating is a process where two or more parties attempt to come to an agreement and is an essential career skill.
  • Negotiations are appropriate in situations without a fixed price or deal, and all parties should believe they got a good deal.
  • The key to the negotiation process is preparation, face-to-face interactions, understanding what is being negotiated, and putting agreements in writing.
  • Negotiations do not have to be a zero-sum game, and it's important to take your time and stop selling once there is an agreement.

Influence and Power in Organizations

  • Legitimate power is based on the user’s position power, given by the organization, and is appropriate when asking someone to do something within their job scope.
  • Rational persuasion is a helpful influencing tactic for managers and involves explaining why objective needs are met, how meeting the objective benefits the other party, providing evidence the objective can be met, and explaining how problems/concerns will be handled.
  • Increasing legitimate power involves increasing management experience, exercising authority regularly, following rational persuasion guidelines, and backing up authority with rewards and punishment.
  • Reward power is based on the user’s ability to influence others with something of value to them and is appropriate when employees should be rewarded for doing a good job.
  • Guidelines for increasing reward power include gaining and maintaining control over evaluating employees’ performance, finding out what others value, and letting people know you control rewards.
  • Coercive power involves punishment and withholding of rewards to influence compliance and is appropriate while maintaining discipline and enforcing rules.
  • Guidelines for increasing coercive power include gaining authority to use punishment and withhold rewards, not making rash threats, and being persistent.
  • Referent power is based on the user’s personal relationships with others and is appropriate for people with weak or no position power.
  • Increasing referent power involves developing people skills and working on relationships with managers and peers.
  • Expert power is based on the user’s skill and knowledge, often using the rational persuasion influencing tactic, and is appropriate when new managers rely on employees’ expertise.
  • Guidelines for increasing expert power include increasing training, attending trade meetings, keeping up with the latest technology, and projecting a positive self-concept.
  • Information power is based on the user’s data desired by others and is appropriate when making rational persuasion or inspirational appeals. Guidelines for increasing information power include having information flow through you, knowing what is going on in the organization, and developing a network of information sources.

Influence and Power in Organizations

  • Legitimate power is based on the user’s position power, given by the organization, and is appropriate when asking someone to do something within their job scope.
  • Rational persuasion is a helpful influencing tactic for managers and involves explaining why objective needs are met, how meeting the objective benefits the other party, providing evidence the objective can be met, and explaining how problems/concerns will be handled.
  • Increasing legitimate power involves increasing management experience, exercising authority regularly, following rational persuasion guidelines, and backing up authority with rewards and punishment.
  • Reward power is based on the user’s ability to influence others with something of value to them and is appropriate when employees should be rewarded for doing a good job.
  • Guidelines for increasing reward power include gaining and maintaining control over evaluating employees’ performance, finding out what others value, and letting people know you control rewards.
  • Coercive power involves punishment and withholding of rewards to influence compliance and is appropriate while maintaining discipline and enforcing rules.
  • Guidelines for increasing coercive power include gaining authority to use punishment and withhold rewards, not making rash threats, and being persistent.
  • Referent power is based on the user’s personal relationships with others and is appropriate for people with weak or no position power.
  • Increasing referent power involves developing people skills and working on relationships with managers and peers.
  • Expert power is based on the user’s skill and knowledge, often using the rational persuasion influencing tactic, and is appropriate when new managers rely on employees’ expertise.
  • Guidelines for increasing expert power include increasing training, attending trade meetings, keeping up with the latest technology, and projecting a positive self-concept.
  • Information power is based on the user’s data desired by others and is appropriate when making rational persuasion or inspirational appeals. Guidelines for increasing information power include having information flow through you, knowing what is going on in the organization, and developing a network of information sources.

Description

Learn about connection power and how it is based on relationships with influential people, as well as the appropriate use and guidelines for increasing connection power in professional settings.

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