Aggregates 1

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120 Questions

Particle size has no effect on the surface area of concrete.

False

Concrete mixtures with larger coarse aggregates require more cement.

False

Mixtures with larger coarse aggregates require less water.

True

Fineness Modulus (FM) is calculated by dividing the sum of cumulative percentages by 50.

False

Iron particles in aggregates contribute to the occurrence of Popouts.

True

D-Cracking can be caused by harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates.

True

D-cracking is caused by the freeze-thaw deterioration of the fine aggregate within concrete.

False

Aggregates containing iron particles are less likely to contribute to alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR).

False

Aggregates are potentially harmful if they interfere with the normal hydration of cement.

True

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of basalt aggregates.

False

Popouts in concrete are caused by external pressure.

False

The use of crushed air-cooled blast-furnace slag as concrete aggregate can lead to AAR.

False

Iron oxide stains in aggregates are caused by impurities in the fine aggregate.

False

Concrete with heavy-weight aggregates like magnetite and steel punchings can have a density of up to 6400 kg/m3 (400 lb/ft3).

True

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) involves a reaction between the active mineral constituents of aggregates and alkali hydroxides in the concrete.

True

Recycled waste concrete aggregates can include brick and glass.

True

Recycled Sand is considered a coarse aggregate.

False

The majority of aggregate tests and characteristics are referenced in ASTM C 33 (AASHTO M 6/M 80).

True

Grading of aggregate is determined by a sieve analysis using round openings.

False

Fine aggregate sieves have openings ranging from 150 μm to 9.5 mm.

True

D-Cracking is a type of alkali-aggregate reaction.

False

Aggregate represents 60% to 75% of concrete mass

True

Harmful Reactive Substances in concrete can lead to deterioration over time.

True

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) can be controlled by reducing the alkali loading in concrete mixes.

True

D-Cracking is a beneficial property of aggregates

False

Popouts in concrete are caused by the presence of excess moisture during curing.

False

Harmful Reactive Substances in aggregates can lead to concrete deterioration

True

The presence of iron particles in aggregates can contribute to the occurrence of Popouts in concrete.

True

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) is not a concern when using aggregates in concrete

False

Popouts in aggregates are desirable for enhancing concrete strength

False

D-Cracking is typically caused by the freeze-thaw deterioration of the fine aggregate within concrete.

True

Harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates can lead to D-Cracking.

True

Iron particles in aggregates are less likely to contribute to alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR).

False

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by external pressure.

False

Iron particles in aggregates contribute to the occurrence of Popouts.

True

Fineness Modulus (FM) is calculated by dividing the sum of cumulative percentages by 50.

False

Concrete mixtures with larger coarse aggregates require more water.

False

Aggregates are potentially harmful if they interfere with the normal hydration of cement.

True

The use of crushed air-cooled blast-furnace slag as concrete aggregate can lead to Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR).

True

Particle size has no effect on the surface area of concrete.

False

D-Cracking can be caused by harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates.

True

Iron particles in aggregates are less likely to contribute to alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR).

False

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of excess moisture during curing.

False

Harmful Reactive Substances in concrete can lead to deterioration over time.

True

Mixtures with larger coarse aggregates require less water.

False

D-Cracking can be caused by the presence of harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates.

True

Iron particles in aggregates are less likely to contribute to Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR).

False

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of excess moisture during curing.

False

The use of crushed air-cooled blast-furnace slag as concrete aggregate can lead to Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR).

True

Popouts in aggregates are desirable for enhancing concrete strength.

False

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by internal pressure that leaves a shallow, typically conical depression.

True

D-Cracking along a transverse joint is caused by the failure of carbonate fine aggregate.

False

Aggregates containing harmful reactive substances can lead to D-Cracking in concrete.

False

Iron oxide stains in aggregates are typically caused by impurities in the fine aggregate.

False

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) involves a reaction between active mineral constituents of some aggregates and alkali hydroxides in the concrete.

True

Recycled waste concrete aggregates can include brick and glass.

True

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of basalt aggregates.

False

Iron particles in aggregates contribute to the occurrence of popouts in concrete.

False

Harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates can lead to D-Cracking.

True

D-Cracking is a beneficial property of aggregates.

False

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of iron particles in aggregates.

False

D-Cracking is typically caused by harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates.

True

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) is not a concern when using aggregates in concrete.

False

Iron particles in aggregates are less likely to contribute to alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR).

True

Harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates can lead to D-Cracking over time.

True

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of excess moisture during curing.

False

Iron particles in aggregates are less likely to contribute to alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR).

False

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) is not a concern when using aggregates in concrete.

False

Harmful Reactive Substances in aggregates can lead to concrete deterioration.

True

D-Cracking is typically caused by the freeze-thaw deterioration of the fine aggregate within concrete.

False

The absorption and surface moisture of aggregates should not be determined for controlling the total water content of concrete.

False

Recycled Sand is considered a fine aggregate.

False

The use of crushed air-cooled blast-furnace slag as concrete aggregate can lead to Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR).

False

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by external pressure.

False

Iron particles in aggregates are less likely to contribute to alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR).

False

Particle size has no effect on the surface area of concrete.

False

D-Cracking can be caused by harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates.

True

Popouts in aggregates are desirable for enhancing concrete strength.

False

Mixtures with larger coarse aggregates require less water.

False

Aggregates are potentially harmful if they interfere with the normal hydration of cement.

True

D-Cracking is typically caused by the freeze-thaw deterioration of the fine aggregate within concrete.

False

Aggregates containing harmful reactive substances can lead to D-Cracking in concrete.

False

Iron particles in aggregates are less likely to contribute to alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR).

False

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of basalt aggregates.

False

D-Cracking is typically caused by freeze-thaw deterioration of the fine aggregate within concrete.

True

Harmful Reactive Substances in concrete can lead to deterioration over time.

True

Harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates can lead to the occurrence of D-Cracking over time.

False

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) is a concern when using certain aggregates in concrete mixes.

True

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of basalt aggregates.

False

The presence of iron particles in aggregates can contribute to the occurrence of popouts in concrete.

True

D-Cracking can be caused by the presence of harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates.

True

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of excess moisture during curing.

False

Iron particles in aggregates are less likely to contribute to alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR).

False

Harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates can lead to D-Cracking over time.

True

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) can be controlled by reducing the alkali loading in concrete mixes.

True

D-Cracking is typically caused by the freeze-thaw deterioration of the coarse aggregate within concrete.

False

Harmful reactive substances in aggregates can lead to D-Cracking in concrete.

True

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) primarily involves a reaction between alkali hydroxides in concrete and iron particles in aggregates.

False

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by internal pressure that leaves a conical depression.

True

Iron particles in aggregates are less likely to contribute to Popouts in concrete.

False

D-Cracking can be caused by the presence of harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates.

True

Iron particles in aggregates are less likely to contribute to alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR).

False

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of iron particles in aggregates.

False

Harmful Reactive Substances in concrete aggregates can lead to the occurrence of D-Cracking over time.

True

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) is not a concern when using aggregates in concrete.

False

The presence of iron particles in aggregates can contribute to the occurrence of Alkali-Carbonate Reaction (ACR).

False

Popouts in concrete are typically caused by the presence of harmful reactive substances in aggregates.

False

D-Cracking can be caused by the presence of iron particles in aggregates.

False

The use of crushed limestone as a replacement for reactive aggregate can help control Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR).

True

Iron particles in aggregates are more likely to contribute to D-Cracking than to Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR).

True

Popouts in concrete are caused by internal pressure that leaves a shallow, typically conical depression.

False

Harmful Reactive Substances in aggregates can lead to concrete deterioration.

True

Fine aggregate sieves have openings ranging from 150 μm to 9.5 mm.

False

D-Cracking is caused by harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates.

False

Iron particles in aggregates contribute to the occurrence of Popouts in concrete.

True

The absorption and surface moisture of aggregates should not be determined for controlling the total water content of concrete.

False

Iron oxide stains in aggregates are caused by impurities in the fine aggregate.

False

D-Cracking can be caused by harmful reactive substances in concrete aggregates.

True

Alkali-Aggregate Reactivity (AAR) involves a reaction between active mineral constituents of some aggregates and alkali hydroxides in the concrete.

True

Mixtures with larger coarse aggregates require less water.

False

Test your knowledge on alkali silica reactivity (ASR) in concrete. This quiz covers topics such as the effects of different aggregates, alkali loading limits, moisture content, use of lithium-based admixtures, and the impact of supplementary cementing materials on ASR.

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