Mastering Classical Conditioning

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What is classical conditioning?

The learning of a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event

What is the difference between stimulus generalization and stimulus discrimination?

Stimulus generalization is the phenomenon of how strong the conditioned response will be to other similar stimuli not experienced during the training trials, while stimulus discrimination is training an animal to produce the response only to a specific stimulus.

What is extinction?

The process of extinguishing a conditioned response

What is spontaneous recovery?

The reappearance of a conditioned response after a period of rest following extinction

What is the Little Albert experiment?

The acquisition of a classically conditioned fear response in a human infant

What was the formerly neutral stimulus in the Little Albert experiment?

A white rat

What is stimulus generalization?

The phenomenon of how strong the conditioned response will be to other similar stimuli not experienced during the training trials

What is rapid reacquisition?

The quicker re-learning of a conditioned response after sustained extinction

  • Classical conditioning allows organisms to ______ the future and potentially save themselves from harm.

predict

  • The three phases of classical conditioning are the conditions before conditioning, during conditioning (learning associations), and ______ conditioning.

after

  • A formerly neutral stimulus becomes a conditioned stimulus that can cause a ______ reflex response.

conditioned

  • In conditioning, the initially neutral stimulus becomes a conditioned stimulus, and the unconditioned response becomes a ______ response.

conditioned

  • Stimulus discrimination is training an animal to produce the response only to a specific ______.

stimulus

  • The Little Albert experiment is foundational for understanding phobias and other anxiety and ______ disorders.

stress

  • Rapid reacquisition is the quicker ______-learning of a conditioned response after sustained extinction.

re

  • Two fundamental forms of non-associative learning are sensitization and ______.

habituation

What is classical conditioning and why is it important?

Classical conditioning is a form of learning that involves a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event, producing a learned reflex response. It is important because it allows organisms to predict the future and potentially save themselves from harm.

What are the learning outcomes for classical conditioning?

The learning outcomes for classical conditioning include understanding terminology and phenomena, generating hypotheses, and interpreting graphs.

What are the three phases of classical conditioning?

The three phases of classical conditioning are the conditions before conditioning, during conditioning (learning associations), and after conditioning.

What is stimulus generalization?

Stimulus generalization is the phenomenon of how strong the conditioned response will be to other similar stimuli not experienced during the training trials.

What is stimulus discrimination?

Stimulus discrimination is training an animal to produce the response only to a specific stimulus.

What is extinction?

Extinction is the process of extinguishing a conditioned response.

What is spontaneous recovery?

Spontaneous recovery is the reappearance of a conditioned response after a period of rest following extinction.

What is the Little Albert experiment and why is it important?

The Little Albert experiment was an experiment conducted by Watson to demonstrate classical conditioning in a human infant. It is important because it demonstrated the acquisition of a classically conditioned fear response in a human infant and is foundational for understanding phobias and other anxiety and stress disorders.

Study Notes

Classical Conditioning: From Pavlov to Watson

  • The lectures trace a historical journey through psychology, starting with early theories of learning and ending with an understanding of internal mental processes.

  • Classical conditioning is one of the most fundamental forms of learning.

  • Learning outcomes for classical conditioning include understanding terminology and phenomena, generating hypotheses, and interpreting graphs.

  • Classical conditioning allows organisms to predict the future and potentially save themselves from harm.

  • Learning is defined as biological, cognitive, and social processes that produce long-lasting changes in behavior, abilities, and knowledge.

  • Two fundamental forms of non-associative learning are sensitization and habituation.

  • Classical conditioning is a form of associative learning that involves a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event.

  • Pavlov's dogs learned to predict the presentation of food and salivated automatically before the food was presented.

  • Classical conditioning involves learning a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event, producing a learned reflex response.

  • The three phases of classical conditioning are the conditions before conditioning, during conditioning (learning associations), and after conditioning.

  • In conditioning, the initially neutral stimulus becomes a conditioned stimulus, and the unconditioned response becomes a conditioned response.

  • A generic learning curve for a classically conditioned response shows the strength of the response as a function of the number of conditioning trials.Classical Conditioning and the Little Albert Experiment

  • Classical conditioning is the learning of a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event.

  • A formerly neutral stimulus becomes a conditioned stimulus that can cause a conditioned reflex response.

  • Pavlov demonstrated that the classically conditioned salivation response would generalize to other similar stimuli.

  • Stimulus generalization is the phenomenon of how strong the conditioned response will be to other similar stimuli not experienced during the training trials.

  • Stimulus discrimination is training an animal to produce the response only to a specific stimulus.

  • Extinction is the process of extinguishing a conditioned response.

  • Spontaneous recovery is the reappearance of a conditioned response after a period of rest following extinction.

  • Rapid reacquisition is the quicker re-learning of a conditioned response after sustained extinction.

  • Watson believed in the role of conditioned learning in shaping human development and set out to demonstrate classical conditioning in a human infant.

  • The Little Albert experiment demonstrated the acquisition of a classically conditioned fear response in a human infant.

  • The formerly neutral stimulus in the Little Albert experiment was a white rat.

  • The Little Albert experiment is foundational for understanding phobias and other anxiety and stress disorders.

Classical Conditioning: From Pavlov to Watson

  • The lectures trace a historical journey through psychology, starting with early theories of learning and ending with an understanding of internal mental processes.

  • Classical conditioning is one of the most fundamental forms of learning.

  • Learning outcomes for classical conditioning include understanding terminology and phenomena, generating hypotheses, and interpreting graphs.

  • Classical conditioning allows organisms to predict the future and potentially save themselves from harm.

  • Learning is defined as biological, cognitive, and social processes that produce long-lasting changes in behavior, abilities, and knowledge.

  • Two fundamental forms of non-associative learning are sensitization and habituation.

  • Classical conditioning is a form of associative learning that involves a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event.

  • Pavlov's dogs learned to predict the presentation of food and salivated automatically before the food was presented.

  • Classical conditioning involves learning a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event, producing a learned reflex response.

  • The three phases of classical conditioning are the conditions before conditioning, during conditioning (learning associations), and after conditioning.

  • In conditioning, the initially neutral stimulus becomes a conditioned stimulus, and the unconditioned response becomes a conditioned response.

  • A generic learning curve for a classically conditioned response shows the strength of the response as a function of the number of conditioning trials.Classical Conditioning and the Little Albert Experiment

  • Classical conditioning is the learning of a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event.

  • A formerly neutral stimulus becomes a conditioned stimulus that can cause a conditioned reflex response.

  • Pavlov demonstrated that the classically conditioned salivation response would generalize to other similar stimuli.

  • Stimulus generalization is the phenomenon of how strong the conditioned response will be to other similar stimuli not experienced during the training trials.

  • Stimulus discrimination is training an animal to produce the response only to a specific stimulus.

  • Extinction is the process of extinguishing a conditioned response.

  • Spontaneous recovery is the reappearance of a conditioned response after a period of rest following extinction.

  • Rapid reacquisition is the quicker re-learning of a conditioned response after sustained extinction.

  • Watson believed in the role of conditioned learning in shaping human development and set out to demonstrate classical conditioning in a human infant.

  • The Little Albert experiment demonstrated the acquisition of a classically conditioned fear response in a human infant.

  • The formerly neutral stimulus in the Little Albert experiment was a white rat.

  • The Little Albert experiment is foundational for understanding phobias and other anxiety and stress disorders.

Classical Conditioning: From Pavlov to Watson

  • The lectures trace a historical journey through psychology, starting with early theories of learning and ending with an understanding of internal mental processes.

  • Classical conditioning is one of the most fundamental forms of learning.

  • Learning outcomes for classical conditioning include understanding terminology and phenomena, generating hypotheses, and interpreting graphs.

  • Classical conditioning allows organisms to predict the future and potentially save themselves from harm.

  • Learning is defined as biological, cognitive, and social processes that produce long-lasting changes in behavior, abilities, and knowledge.

  • Two fundamental forms of non-associative learning are sensitization and habituation.

  • Classical conditioning is a form of associative learning that involves a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event.

  • Pavlov's dogs learned to predict the presentation of food and salivated automatically before the food was presented.

  • Classical conditioning involves learning a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event, producing a learned reflex response.

  • The three phases of classical conditioning are the conditions before conditioning, during conditioning (learning associations), and after conditioning.

  • In conditioning, the initially neutral stimulus becomes a conditioned stimulus, and the unconditioned response becomes a conditioned response.

  • A generic learning curve for a classically conditioned response shows the strength of the response as a function of the number of conditioning trials.Classical Conditioning and the Little Albert Experiment

  • Classical conditioning is the learning of a predictive relationship between a neutral stimulus and a biologically significant event.

  • A formerly neutral stimulus becomes a conditioned stimulus that can cause a conditioned reflex response.

  • Pavlov demonstrated that the classically conditioned salivation response would generalize to other similar stimuli.

  • Stimulus generalization is the phenomenon of how strong the conditioned response will be to other similar stimuli not experienced during the training trials.

  • Stimulus discrimination is training an animal to produce the response only to a specific stimulus.

  • Extinction is the process of extinguishing a conditioned response.

  • Spontaneous recovery is the reappearance of a conditioned response after a period of rest following extinction.

  • Rapid reacquisition is the quicker re-learning of a conditioned response after sustained extinction.

  • Watson believed in the role of conditioned learning in shaping human development and set out to demonstrate classical conditioning in a human infant.

  • The Little Albert experiment demonstrated the acquisition of a classically conditioned fear response in a human infant.

  • The formerly neutral stimulus in the Little Albert experiment was a white rat.

  • The Little Albert experiment is foundational for understanding phobias and other anxiety and stress disorders.

Test your knowledge of classical conditioning, from its origins with Pavlov to the groundbreaking Little Albert experiment conducted by Watson. This quiz will cover the fundamental principles of classical conditioning, including terminology, phenomena, and the different phases involved. Explore the concepts of stimulus generalization, discrimination, extinction, spontaneous recovery, and rapid reacquisition. This quiz will also test your understanding of how classical conditioning plays a role in shaping human development and the acquisition of phobias and anxiety disorders. Get ready to learn and

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