Sports Injuries Classification
18 Questions
0 Views
3.3 Stars

Sports Injuries Classification

Classifying and evaluating sports injuries requires understanding anatomy, causation, and forces involved. Learn about primary injuries, including acute, chronic, and externally or intrinsically caused injuries.

Created by
@InestimablePlot

Questions and Answers

What is the term for a fracture where the bone protrudes through the skin?

Compound fracture

What is the term for a sudden traumatic blow to the body that causes soft tissue to compress against the bone?

Contusion

What is the term for a stretch or separation of ligamentous fibers resulting from a force causing a joint to move beyond its normal limits of motion?

Sprain

What is the term for a painful involuntary muscle contraction?

<p>Muscle Cramp</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is the primary reason for classifying sports injuries?

<p>To identify the major anatomy, causation, and forces involved in the injury</p> Signup and view all the answers

What type of injury results from repetitive overloading of the body associated with continuous training/conditioning?

<p>Microtrauma</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is the term for a gradual wasting away of muscle due to disease or injury?

<p>Muscle Atrophy</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is the most frequent cause of athletic injuries?

<p>Macrotrauma</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is the term for a type of fracture that involves the epiphyseal plate of a long bone?

<p>Epiphysial fracture</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is the term for a collection of blood that forms a clot and becomes encapsulated by a connective tissue membrane?

<p>Hematoma</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is an example of an early secondary problem that may arise if an injury is not properly treated?

<p>Chronic swelling</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is the term for inflammation of a tendon with a gradual onset caused by repeated microtrauma and degenerative change?

<p>Tendonitis</p> Signup and view all the answers

What type of force is responsible for bending injuries?

<p>Torsion force</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is the term for a type of injury that occurs when at least one bone in an articulation is forced out of its normal and proper alignment?

<p>Dislocation</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is an example of an unexposed injury?

<p>Muscle strain</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is the term for a disruption in the continuity of a bone?

<p>Fracture</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is the term for a type of pain that is perceived at a location remote from the injured site?

<p>Referred pain</p> Signup and view all the answers

What type of fracture is characterized by an incomplete fracture?

<p>Greenstick fracture</p> Signup and view all the answers

Study Notes

Classification of Sports Injuries

  • Classification of sports injuries is essential before evaluation, inspection, and recognition
  • Involves understanding major anatomy, causation, and forces involved in the injury

Primary Injuries

  • Result directly from the stress imposed by a particular sport
  • Can be acute (caused by trauma) or chronic (result from overuse)
  • Can be externally or intrinsically caused
  • Examples: macrotrauma (fractures, dislocations, contusions, strains) and microtrauma (tendonitis)

Secondary Injuries

  • May arise if the injury has not been properly treated initially
  • May arise if the athlete has been allowed to return to competition too soon
  • Examples: early secondary problems (chronic swelling, joint laxity, weakness) and later secondary problems (arthritis, repeated re-injury, instability)

Mechanical Forces of Injury

  • Types of mechanical forces: compressive, tensile, shear, stress, strain, elastic limit, plastic deformation, bending, and torsion
  • Altered movement patterns, altered recruitment patterns, and altered proprioception can lead to abnormal loading and increased tissue stress/strain

Anatomical Classification

  • External injuries: skin, wound is highly visible
  • Internal and unexposed injuries: muscles, ligament, bone, cartilage, nerves, joint capsules

Exposed Skin Injuries

  • Examples: abrasion, laceration, incision, puncture wound, impaled object, and burns

Unexposed Injuries

  • Unexposed or closed wounds in sports include those injuries which do not penetrate the epidermal skin layer

Injury Classification

  • Majority of athletic injuries involve the neuromusculoskeletal system
  • Involves osseous, soft tissue, or nerve injuries
  • Affects body tissues: bone, cartilage, muscle, tendon, ligament, skin, bursa, nerve

Fractures

  • Defined as a disruption in the continuity of a bone
  • Types: simple (closed), compound (open), greenstick (incomplete fracture), stress (incomplete fracture), and epiphysial (fracture involving the epiphyseal plate of a long bone)

Dislocation

  • Defined as when at least one bone in an articulation is forced out of its normal and proper alignment
  • Bone ends are no longer in contact
  • Types: luxation (complete separation) and sub-luxation (partial congruency remains)

Contusion

  • Defined as a compression injury caused by a sudden traumatic blow to the body
  • Soft tissue is compressed against the bone resulting in capillary damage
  • Also known as a bruise

Hematoma

  • Defined as a localized collection of blood that has leaked from blood vessels
  • Formed by the localization of blood leaking into a clot that becomes encapsulated by a connective tissue membrane

Myositis Ossificans

  • Defined as the accumulation of calcium deposits in muscle tissue (ectopic calcification)
  • Result of repeated blows to the same area
  • May have accumulation in the muscle belly or spur projecting from the underlying bone

Strain

  • Defined as a stretch, tear, or separation in the muscle or adjacent tissue such as the fascia or tendon
  • Classified as grade 1, 2, or 3
  • Result of overstretching or a forced contraction against too much resistance

Tendon and Muscle Injuries

  • Grade 1: minimal loss of structural integrity, little or no swelling, localized tenderness, minimal bruising, minimal function loss
  • Grade 2: moderate loss of structural integrity, significant structural weakening, some abnormal motion, solid end feel to stress, bruising and swelling, often associated with hemarthrosis and effusion
  • Grade 3: complete loss of structural integrity, marked abnormal motion, significant bruising, hemarthrosis, needs prolonged protection, may require surgery

Muscle Cramp

  • Defined as a painful involuntary muscle contraction
  • May be the result of dehydration, fatigue

Muscle Guarding

  • Defined as involuntary muscle contractions that occur in response to pain following musculoskeletal injury
  • May be a spasm or spasticity due to upper motor neuron lesion in the brain

Muscle Atrophy

  • Defined as a gradual wasting away of muscle due to disease
  • May be due to neurological injury or pain inhibition

Muscle Contracture

  • Defined as abnormal shortening of muscle and other soft tissue where there is a great deal of resistance to passive stretch

Sprain

  • Defined as a stretch or separation of ligamentous fibers resulting from a force causing a joint to move beyond its normal limits of motion
  • Classified as per strains

Tendonitis

  • Defined as inflammation and tenderness of a tendon with a gradual onset caused by repeated microtrauma and degenerative change
  • May be degenerative changes in a tendon without inflammation

Bursitis

  • Defined as inflammation of a bursa caused by overuse of muscle or tendon at a bony prominence, or by constant external compression or trauma
  • Result from friction leading to inflammation and irritation which causes the bursa to produce large amounts of synovial fluid

Nerve Injuries

  • Result from tensile or compressive forces
  • Can have sensory or motor changes
  • Classified as grade 1, 2, or 3

Pain

  • Defined as referred pain (pain that is perceived at a location remote from the injured site) or radiating pain (pain that is felt both at its source and along a nerve)

Studying That Suits You

Use AI to generate personalized quizzes and flashcards to suit your learning preferences.

Quiz Team

More Quizzes Like This

Use Quizgecko on...
Browser
Browser