It Ain't So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas Multiple Choice Questions

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What is the main reason for the frequent moves of the narrator's family?

Escaping from dangerous or unpleasant environments

What does the description of Newport Beach convey about the differences between the narrator's previous and current locations?

Newport Beach is characterized by affluence and cleanliness, in contrast to the previous locations.

What lesson has the narrator learned from their nomadic lifestyle?

The significance of material possessions and their durability

What distinguishes the narrator's family's moving pattern from that of 'normal' families?

The narrator's family moves to entirely new cities or countries with each relocation, unlike 'normal' families who typically move within the same town.

What type of home did the narrator's family move to in Newport Beach?

Condo with a large lawn

Who emphasizes the importance of not losing the pool key to the narrator's family?

Mrs. Mavis

What task is the narrator specifically assigned regarding the rulebook for condominium living?

Translating for her mother

What aspect of their previous home in Compton is highlighted in contrast to their new home in Newport Beach?

Plastic flowers and a small patch of grass

What does the narrator's mother express a desire to do, based on her concerns about following the rules?

Return to Iran

What does the narrator imagine doing with their new neighbors despite feeling like they don't fit the picture-perfect image?

Having a party

What does the narrator feel burdened by in their new environment?

Constantly translating for her mother

What is emphasized as the family's main challenge in their new neighborhood?

Cultural and environmental adjustment

What does the text primarily provide insight into?

The family's experiences and emotions

What does the rulebook for condominium living include regulations for?

Waste management

What does the narrator's family enjoy doing in their new home?

Grilling

What does the narrator desire not to be for her mother forever?

Her translator

What does the protagonist dream of owning?

A canopy bed and a beanbag chair

What is the name of Original Cindy's dog?

Mick Jagger

Where does the family get most of their furniture from?

An auction of seized goods

What are the names of Original Cindy's kittens?

Captain and Tennille

What does the dad surprise the protagonist with from Sears?

New furniture including the canopy bed of her dreams

What type of pictures adorn Original Cindy's home?

Framed pictures of horses

What does the dad hope the protagonist can use the furniture until?

She graduates from high school

What is the name of the favorite song shared by the narrator and Original Cindy?

'Love Will Keep Us Together'

What does the protagonist ask for in addition to the new furniture?

A beanbag chair

What does the narrator's mother remind her not to lose?

The pool key

What does the protagonist's dad make a humorous comment about when she asks for a beanbag chair?

Eating beans instead of sitting on them

What is the name of Original Cindy's horse?

Magic

What does the protagonist encounter at the furniture store?

A girl her age who glares at her

What literary reference does Original Cindy show interest in?

'Black Beauty'

What is the family's nightly routine?

Sitting on the sofa, eating dinner, and watching a comedy

What type of pets does Original Cindy own?

Two kittens, a lizard, and a dog

What color is the protagonist's all-new bedroom set?

All-white

What is the narrator's attempt to connect with Original Cindy through?

Literary references

What does the dad focus on while surprising the protagonist with new furniture?

Iranian currency

What type of pictures do people in Iran typically frame?

Pictures of deceased elderly relatives

What does the protagonist realize at the end of the text?

She is starting at a new school again

What is the name of Original Cindy's favorite band?

The Rolling Stones

What does the condo pool feature?

Lounge chairs, tables, a barbecue, and a twisty slide

What is the meaning of the protagonist's name, Zomorod?

Emerald

What name does the protagonist wish she had instead of Zomorod?

Sara

What name does the protagonist choose for herself in an attempt to fit in?

Cindy

What does the protagonist's mother not know how to make, highlighting cultural differences?

Oatmeal raisin cookies

What does the protagonist's desire to change her name reflect?

Her struggle to navigate her dual identity as an Iranian-American girl

What leads to a moment of connection for the protagonist with a neighbor named Cindy?

They share the same name

What do Zomorod's parents express concern about regarding her integration into American culture?

Questioning her about American customs like throwing a pie in someone's face

What does Zomorod's story shed light on?

The complexities of immigrant experiences and cultural assimilation

What does Zomorod's journey reflect?

The internal conflict of embracing her Iranian heritage while seeking acceptance in American society

What does Zomorod's narrative capture?

The universal themes of identity, belonging, and the challenges of cultural integration faced by many immigrant children

What does Zomorod's journey reflect?

The internal conflict of embracing her Iranian heritage while seeking acceptance in American society

What does Zomorod's journey reflect?

The internal conflict of embracing her Iranian heritage while seeking acceptance in American society

What game does David want to play, based on the text?

The Six Million Dollar Man

What sound does the narrator have to make during the game?

Eee, eee, eee, eee

What happens when the narrator's throat starts getting scratchy and sore?

David yells 'Sound effects' and the narrator has to continue making the sound

What does the narrator suggest is cooler than playing 'The Six Million Dollar Man'?

Unknown

What was the reason for the U.S. and British governments to get rid of Mohammad Mossadegh, the popular prime minister of Iran?

He refused to allow Western powers to profit from Iran's oil

What strategy did the shah use to handle the protesters?

Military intervention and suppression

Why did the shah allow Western powers to profit from Iran's oil?

He was willing to let Western powers profit from Iran's oil

What does Cindy wish she could skip and be like Pippi Longstocking?

School

What does Cindy's dad mistakenly call her before she corrects him?

Susan

What does Mrs. Klein offer to help Cindy's mom with?

Make friends

What does Original Cindy criticize Cindy for not knowing about?

A song

What does the story primarily revolve around?

Cindy's experiences and interactions with friends and family

What does Original Cindy reject doing with Cindy?

Getting tans together

What does Cindy's dad humorously mistake her name for?

Susan

What does Cindy change her name from?

Susan

What does Cindy's friend, Original Cindy, criticize her for?

Not talking much

What does Cindy plan to do with Original Cindy, but gets rejected?

Get tans together

What does Cindy wake up with on the day she wishes she could skip school?

Stomachache

What does the narrative include elements of?

Friendship, cultural differences, and personal struggles

What is the protagonist's real name?

Zomorod

What is the central theme regarding the protagonist's experience at the new school?

Feeling overwhelmed and out of place

What leads to a pop quiz as punishment in the text?

A boy defacing a poster in class

What does the protagonist hope to achieve by introducing herself as Cindy?

To blend in and avoid using her real name, Zomorod

What is the protagonist's initial reaction to the teacher already knowing her real name?

Feeling less anxious

What causes a scene when the protagonist arrives late to her next class?

The teacher struggles to pronounce her real name

What is a recurring motif in the text?

The protagonist's discomfort with her name and desire to blend in

What is evident throughout the text regarding the protagonist?

Feelings of anxiety and isolation

What contributes to the protagonist's feeling of intimidation at the new school?

Avoiding eye contact with older students

What is the punishment for the disruption caused by a boy defacing a poster in class?

A pop quiz

What does the protagonist struggle with regarding the school's schedule?

It changes each day with no helpful guides

What does the teacher's welcoming gesture do for the protagonist?

Makes her feel less anxious

What cultural backgrounds do the new student and Carolyn bond over?

Iranian and Norwegian

What does the new student express admiration for in the United States?

Freedom of speech

What activity do Carolyn and the new student plan to join together?

Girl Scout troop

What do Carolyn and the new student bond over during their lunch meetings?

Shared love of books

What topic do the new student and Carolyn discuss regarding Iran?

Ongoing demonstrations and limited freedom of speech

What does the new student's mother seem indifferent to?

Her excitement about joining the Girl Scouts

What does the new student find Carolyn to be in Newport Beach?

The coolest person

What does the new student express genuine enthusiasm for?

Joining the Girl Scouts

What does Carolyn share examples of in the United States?

Freedom of speech

What does the new student express admiration for in Carolyn?

Interest in becoming a journalist and knowledge of global events

What do the new student and Carolyn plan to continue?

Their lunch meetings

What does the new student struggle to keep up with in gym class?

Activities she's unfamiliar with

What does the PE teacher emphasize with the motto 'No pain, no gain'?

The importance of pushing oneself physically to achieve results

What does the protagonist attempt to assert by asking to be called Cindy?

Their identity

What does the protagonist compare themselves to, feeling different from others?

A turtle

What does the protagonist find solace in at the new school?

Books

What does the protagonist express a desire for in their new environment?

A fresh start and real friendships

What does the protagonist dread in PE class and wish for to avoid participation?

The physical activities planned

What does the protagonist experience in terms of cultural and social challenges?

Struggling to find a sense of belonging

What does the protagonist seek refuge in?

Books

What does the protagonist feel after being further alienated when asking to be called Cindy?

Isolated and misunderstood

What does the protagonist encounter, particularly from a group of girls in PE class?

Bullying and ridicule

What does the protagonist reflect on regarding their experience moving from Compton to Newport Beach?

Feeling like an outsider

What does the protagonist feel after a classmate makes a rude comment about camels?

Isolated and misunderstood

What does the protagonist express a lack of interest in when discussing college plans with Carolyn?

Engineering

What does the protagonist's dad agree to do when asked about going to Carolyn's house?

Drive the protagonist to Carolyn's house

What does the protagonist's mom do while the protagonist is considering asking to go to Carolyn's house?

Watching The Phil Donahue Show

What does the protagonist's dad agree to do when asked about going to Carolyn's house?

Drive the protagonist to Carolyn's house

What is the primary difference highlighted between the privileged and underprivileged in Iran?

Access to education and high-paying jobs

What is the contrasting factor between the United States and Iran regarding individuals rising from poverty to positions of power?

Common occurrence in the United States, unlike in Iran

How is the Shah of Iran's presence described in the country?

Omnipresent, with his image displayed in various public places

What is the primary method through which the Shah of Iran maintains power?

Fear and military might

What aspect of American celebrations is emphasized in contrast to Iranian parades?

Absence of military displays

What contrast is drawn between freedom of expression in America and Iran?

Freedom to express oneself in America and fear of imprisonment in Iran

What economic difference is highlighted between the protagonist and Carolyn?

Low wage for the protagonist and higher wage for Carolyn

What is the primary theme regarding negotiation and financial planning highlighted in the text?

Importance of negotiation and financial planning for college savings

What does the protagonist find exciting about the camping trip?

The chance to explore the outdoors

What does the protagonist enjoy more at the Williams' house than at Taco Bell?

The make-it-yourself concept

What does the Williams family often have for dinner?

Make-it-yourself meals

What does the family use to serve 'make-your-own sundaes' for dessert?

A rotating tray called a Lazy Susan

What does the protagonist learn about the taco shells at the Williams' house?

They come pre-bent in a box

What does the protagonist feel about living in one place all your life?

It is comforting

What does the protagonist exchange with a girl named Rachel at a break during the meeting?

Phone numbers

What does the Girl Scout troop in Newport Beach discuss as potential activities?

Camping trips and volunteering at the Goodwill

What does the protagonist feel about the dinner at the Williams' house compared to her family's usual dinner?

She finds it more enjoyable

What is the protagonist determined to save money for?

College

What is the size of the Girl Scout troop in Newport Beach?

Around 80 girls

Who are the Girl Scout leaders in Newport Beach?

Mrs. Stahr and Mrs. Woods

What does the narrator suggest to help her mother adjust to life in America?

Attending a PTA meeting to meet new people and learn English

What does the mother find happiness in when connecting with other Iranian visitors?

Cultural connection through food

What does the narrator's father highlight as a factor making it easier for Americans in Iran?

Presence of a community and access to English-language media

What does the story illustrate about the mother's reluctance to integrate into American society?

Reflects the challenges faced by many immigrants in adjusting to a new country

What does the mother insist on serving to the Iranian visitors, highlighting its significance in Iranian culture?

Traditional Persian food

Why does the mother refuse to attend a PTA meeting despite her daughter's suggestion?

Insists on learning English first

What is the main reason for the mother's reluctance to engage with American culture and make friends?

Struggles with the English language and feelings of isolation

What makes the mother's sense of isolation more acute in America?

Rare encounters with other Iranians

What does the story emphasize about the mother's adjustment to life in America?

Struggles with loneliness and language barriers

What does the narrator's father comment on regarding the ease for Americans in Iran?

Presence of a community and access to English-language media

What does the story highlight as a factor contributing to the mother's happiness in America?

Brief connection with other Iranian visitors

What does the mother's refusal to integrate into American society reflect?

The challenges faced by many immigrants in adjusting to a new country

What does the narrator's father struggle to pronounce on the way to Carolyn's house?

Williams

What does Carolyn's house have adorned on the front door?

A wreath with real flowers and lemons

What does the narrator compare the shah of Iran to when prompted by Carolyn's question?

A character from a fairy tale

What type of TV do the narrator and Carolyn often do homework in front of?

Color Zenith TV

What does the narrator's father admire at Sears but is unable to buy due to differences in electricity current in Iran?

Color Zenith TV models

What does the narrator watch a report about on the color TV, prompting Carolyn to ask about?

Protests in Iran

What do the narrator and Carolyn bond over after playing Yahtzee?

School and academic achievements

What does the narrator receive from Carolyn's mother for the first time?

A compliment

What does the narrator express a fondness for regarding Carolyn's family?

Their house

What does the narrator compare the shah of Iran to when prompted by Carolyn's question?

A character from a fairy tale

What does the narrator's family have at home that her father admires at Sears?

Black-and-white Zenith TV

What does the narrator and Carolyn often do homework in front of?

Color Zenith TV

What does Skip offer to do with the narrator's father?

Go fishing

What does Skip love according to his own words?

Fishing, bulldogs, and beer

What does the narrator and her mother do immediately after shutting the door on Skip?

Discuss buying a gift for Skip

What traditional Iranian dish does the protagonist's mother prepare for the neighbor, Skip?

Dolma

What does the protagonist plan to dress up as for Halloween?

A hobo

What American holiday does the protagonist eagerly anticipate celebrating?

Halloween

Who does the protagonist unexpectedly encounter at Skip's house?

Brock, a classmate who previously teased her

What does the protagonist's mother want her to emulate for Halloween instead of a hobo?

Rita Hayworth

What does the protagonist compare Halloween to in contrast with the Iranian tradition?

Receiving nuts and dried fruits during the Persian New Year

What does the protagonist try to explain to her mother about the concept of a hobo?

The difference between a lifestyle and a Halloween costume

What does the protagonist express disappointment about regarding her mother's understanding?

Lack of understanding and support for her Halloween costume choice

What does the protagonist's mother want her to emulate for Halloween?

Rita Hayworth

What does the protagonist emphasize to her mother about the hobo costume?

The difference between a lifestyle and a Halloween costume

What does the protagonist feel about her mother's lack of understanding regarding the Halloween costume?

Expresses disappointment

What does the protagonist encounter at Skip's house?

Brock, a classmate who previously teased her

What does the protagonist's father plan to give out on Halloween instead of candy?

Miniature boxes of raisins

What did the protagonist's family give out to trick-or-treaters during their first Halloween in America?

Fruits and pickling cucumbers

What costume does Carolyn show off at Halloween?

A box of Arm and Hammer baking soda

What does the protagonist suggest Carolyn dress like next year?

A dictionary

What does the protagonist's friend, Rachel, arrive as for Halloween?

In a cute costume

What does the protagonist's narrative reflect?

Her experiences as an immigrant navigating American traditions and her excitement for Halloween

What did the protagonist dress up as during her second-grade Halloween?

A hippie

What did the protagonist's friend give her for trick-or-treating?

A larger pillowcase

What did the protagonist's family give out to trick-or-treaters during their first Halloween in America?

Fruits and pickling cucumbers

What did the protagonist's friend, Carolyn, show off at Halloween?

A box of Arm and Hammer baking soda

What does the protagonist reminisce about regarding a past Halloween?

When she went trick-or-treating with her father on their street and felt limited in her experience

What did the protagonist's father plan to give out on Halloween instead of candy?

Miniature boxes of raisins

What does the protagonist feel about wearing the traditional Persian villager costume in Newport Beach, California?

Awkward and uncomfortable

What does the protagonist reflect on regarding the challenges of learning English in another country?

The differences between formal English and conversational English

What custom does the protagonist's family engage in when the mother prepares an elaborate meal for the Poo brothers?

Persian custom of taarof

What does the protagonist resent during the engagement in the Persian custom of taarof?

The taarof and the amount of work involved in preparing the meal

What do the Poo brothers demonstrate during the meal?

An insatiable appetite

Why is the protagonist reluctant to spend time with the Poo brothers at the pool?

Due to embarrassment about their behavior and appearance

What do the Poo brothers express a desire to do at the pool?

Meet California girls

What do Pooya and Pooyan wear given to them by their mother to remind them of their homeland?

Gold charms shaped like Iran with a turquoise stone

What does the protagonist reminisce about regarding her memories of Iran?

The beauty of the Caspian Sea

What does the protagonist reflect on regarding her connection to her homeland?

A deep connection to her homeland and the memories associated with it

What does the concept of 'taarof' entail?

Guests can stay for as long as they want, and one must always say yes to a favor to be polite, even if they don't mean it

What gifts do the Iranian brothers bring for the protagonist's family?

Persian miniature painting, dried limes, and a box of pistachios

What does the protagonist find overwhelming about the brothers' arrival?

The brothers' cologne

What parenting style do the protagonist's parents have?

Authoritarian

What is the protagonist's main concern about the Iranian brothers staying with them?

The language barrier and cultural differences

What is the Iranian custom of 'taarof' similar to?

The concept of 'saving face' in some Asian cultures

What is the protagonist's initial reaction to the announcement of the Iranian brothers' visit?

She is not happy about it

What does the protagonist feel frustrated about regarding the Iranian brothers' visit?

Not having a say in the decision to host the brothers

What does the protagonist find exciting about her new neighborhood in Newport Beach?

The neighborhood filled with kids and parents dressed up for Halloween

What does the protagonist look forward to at her new school, Lincoln?

The Presidential Physical Fitness Test

What does the protagonist feel a sense of in Newport Beach?

Belonging

What is the protagonist's reaction to receiving full-size candy bars while trick-or-treating in Newport Beach?

Excited, as she had never received them before in Compton

What word means the belief that there is only one God?

Monotheism

What is the Arabic word for God?

Allah

What do Jews, Christians, and Muslims all believe in?

One God

What did Sherman point out about the beliefs of Jews, Christians, and Muslims?

They believe in one God and trace their roots to Abraham

What camping equipment did the protagonist and her dad purchase at Woolworth's?

Sleeping bag, mesh bag, flashlight, and metal bowl

What does the protagonist's dad refuse to buy at Woolworth's?

Air mattress and folding knife

Who does the protagonist share a tent with at Big Bear?

Carolyn, Rachel, Howie, Kris, and Colleen

What does the protagonist's dad believe camping is similar to?

Being poor

What does the protagonist plan to do with the small porcelain cat given by her mom?

Put it next to her stapler

What modern amenities are not available at the campsite?

Television and flushing toilets

What are the names of the twins the protagonist shares a tent with?

Kris and Colleen

What does the protagonist's mother seem unhappy about?

Her going on the camping trip

What does the protagonist's dad refuse to buy at Woolworth's?

Air mattress and folding knife

What does the protagonist plan to do with the small porcelain cat given by her mom?

Put it next to her stapler

What modern amenities are not available at the campsite?

Television and flushing toilets

What are the names of the twins the protagonist shares a tent with?

Kris and Colleen

What event leads to Cindy's academic performance and emotional state being impacted?

Khomeini's return to Iran

What prompts Cindy's mother to worry about her family in Iran?

Khomeini's return to Iran

What leads to the departure of the Shah and the evacuation of Americans from Iran?

Khomeini rejecting the government of Bakhtiar

What does Cindy plan to wrap the gift for Rachel's bat mitzvah in?

Sunday comics

What historical information does Rachel's father share with Cindy?

Information about Polish Jews in Iran during World War II

What is the significance of February 11, 1979, for Cindy?

The end of the monarchy in Iran and the departure of Americans from the country

Who rejects the government of Bakhtiar, who believes in democracy separate from religion?

Khomeini

What does Khomeini's return to Iran lead to?

The departure of the Shah and the evacuation of Americans from Iran

What does Miss DeAngelo offer to Cindy during her speech?

To hear the rest next week

What causes Cindy to decline Miss DeAngelo's offer to hear the rest of her speech next week?

The revolutionary events in Iran

What event leads to Cindy recalling learning Hebrew and Arabic from Rachel's family?

Cindy being invited to Rachel's bat mitzvah

What impact does the Iranian Revolution have on Cindy's family?

Deeply impacts their daily lives and emotional well-being

What does the narrator express disapproval of regarding Khomeini's decisions?

The restriction of women's rights

What does the narrative highlight regarding the impact of the new regulations on women in Iran?

The requirement to wear cover-ups

What concept does the narrator reflect on regarding the workers at the Goodwill factory?

Dignity

What does the narrator's father express deep concern and sadness over?

The regression in women's rights in Iran

What does the text provide insights into?

The personal experiences and reflections of the narrator regarding the revolution and its impact on women in Iran

What does the narrator recall as highlighting the lack of opportunities for individuals with disabilities in Iran?

A fortuneteller's son with Down syndrome being kept hidden away

What does the narrator's experience at the Goodwill factory lead to?

A conversation with her parents, who are momentarily distracted from the current events in Iran

What does Dr. Klein and the narrator's father discuss regarding the revolution?

The negative impact of the revolution on women's rights in Iran

What does the text highlight regarding the previous modernity in Iran and the new restrictions imposed on women?

The contrast between the previous modernity in Iran and the new restrictions imposed on women

What does the text showcase regarding the shift in women's rights in Iran following the revolution?

A sense of disappointment and worry among the characters

What does the narrator express uncertainty and concern about after a revolution in Iran?

The future

What does the Goodwill factory provide to people with Down syndrome?

Jobs and a chance to be part of society

What does the protagonist's family celebrate in America?

Nowruz

What makes Nowruz a difficult time for the family in America?

The protagonist's mother's emotional conversations with her sisters in Iran

What does the protagonist receive as a gift from her father on Nowruz?

A five-dollar bill

What reflects the influence of American culture on the protagonist's Iranian traditions?

Desire for gifts like gauchos, a pompom belt, and a puka shell necklace

What does the protagonist explain to her American friends about Nowruz traditions?

Excitement and non-religious nature of the holiday in Iran

What complicates communication with family in Iran?

Expensive long-distance calls

What is evident as the protagonist discusses the challenges of celebrating Nowruz in America with her American friends?

Her longing for her family in Iran

What do the protagonist's relatives in Iran express concern about?

Government listening to long-distance phone calls

What does the protagonist emphasize to her American friends about Nowruz?

Non-religious nature and excitement of the holiday in Iran

What does Dr. Klein express concern about?

Government oppression and danger faced by successful individuals in Iran

What is the protagonist's plan for the five-dollar bill received as a gift?

To save it for college

What does the protagonist emphasize to her American friends about Nowruz traditions?

Non-religious nature and excitement of the holiday in Iran

What does the protagonist notice about the girls being asked to dance at the party?

They are asked repeatedly

Where does the protagonist suggest they should have chairs at the event?

By the dance floor

What song does the protagonist hear all of a sudden at the party?

Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive”

How does the protagonist feel about Brock's dancing at the party?

Envious

What does the protagonist's friend suggest taking for SAT vocabulary?

Spanish

What does the protagonist plan to learn influenced by famous English and French-speaking actors?

French

What does the protagonist feel prepared for due to previous schooling in Iran?

Seventh grade

What does Skip, a neighbor, encourage the protagonist to excel in like his brother excels in surfing?

English

What does the protagonist learn about from a friend regarding Spanish street names and the importance of SATs?

Spanish culture

What does the protagonist and friends discuss regarding famous actors and their connections to Newport Beach?

Actors

What does the protagonist's friend suggest taking for SAT vocabulary?

Spanish

What does the protagonist plan to learn influenced by famous English and French-speaking actors?

French

What does the protagonist feel prepared for due to previous schooling in Iran?

Seventh grade

What does Skip, a neighbor, encourage the protagonist to excel in like his brother excels in surfing?

English

What does the protagonist learn about from a friend regarding Spanish street names and the importance of SATs?

Spanish culture

What does the protagonist and friends discuss regarding famous actors and their connections to Newport Beach?

Actors

What food does the narrator's mother want to make for the pool party, but ends up getting a pre-made version instead?

Kebabs

What causes confusion among the friends during the pool party?

The balloon fight

What does the narrator plan for her twelfth birthday?

A pool party

What does the narrator offer to find for her friend, Howie?

An Iranian husband

What does the narrator's friend, Howie, talk about in relation to finding a husband?

Finding a tall husband through prayer

What does the narrator hope for at the school dance?

A boy to ask her to dance

What does the DJ do during the school dance?

Takes a break

What do the girls discuss during the school dance?

Marriage and the narrator's Iranian culture

What does the narrator plan for her twelfth birthday in terms of food?

Menu including hamburgers and a classic yellow cake

What does the party start with at the narrator's twelfth birthday?

A pool game

What does the narrator expect about the party despite her mother's bad mood?

The party to be fun

What does the narrator's mother want to make for the pool party, but ends up getting a pre-made version instead?

Kebabs

What activities does the narrator choose at the camp?

Sailing, snorkeling, and canoeing

What do the campers discover invading their tents on a different day?

Feral pigs

What does the narrator become increasingly drawn to the idea of at the camp?

Becoming a counselor in training

What does the text capture about the narrator's experiences at summer camp?

Her interaction with counselors and friends

Where is the campsite located?

In an unspoiled part of Catalina Island

What does Rainy encourage the narrator to become at the camp?

A counselor in training

What does the text highlight regarding the campers' arrival at Camp White's Landing?

They see flying fish during a boat ride

What does the narrator reflect on regarding her home country, Iran?

The situation for women in Iran

What does the narrator develop a love for at the camp?

Sailing

What do the camp counselors ask the campers to do upon arrival?

Pick camp names and learn the camp song

What are the names the narrator and her friends eventually settle on as camp names?

Sommers, Cleo, and Lentil

What are the warnings given to the campers about the island?

Feral pigs and bison

What gift does the protagonist receive from her friends at her birthday party?

A pompom belt

How does the protagonist convince her parents to let her go to Camp White's Landing?

By promising to be extra careful and not go anywhere alone or in the dark

What does the protagonist wear to prevent sunburn while going to camp?

A floppy sun hat given by her mom

What do the protagonist and her friends see while on the ferry to camp?

Dolphins in the wild

Who narrates the story and expresses their thoughts and interactions with friends and parents?

The protagonist

What does the text capture about the protagonist's experiences?

The protagonist's coming-of-age experiences

What are the protagonist and her friends excited about regarding camp?

The prospect of having fun

What does the protagonist promise her parents about things she wouldn't do at camp?

Not to go anywhere alone or in the dark

What do the protagonist and her friends do on the ferry to camp?

Explore the boat

What do the protagonist and her friends do at her birthday party?

Pelt each other with unbreakable balloons and eat by the pool

What is the protagonist's reaction to attending summer camp for the first time?

Excitement and not being scared at all

What is the protagonist's attitude towards horseback riding at camp?

She convinces her parents by promising to be extra careful

What does the protagonist suggest her father include in his cover letter?

Mention something he has done in his previous jobs

What does the protagonist's father express concern about mentioning in his cover letter?

His disagreement with recent political events

What does the sample resume in the book show that makes the protagonist wonder if it's better?

People who have changed jobs many times

What does the protagonist's father start typing in his cover letter after mentioning his work experience?

Dear Sir or Madam:

What does the protagonist's dad hope to achieve by putting the Lindens’ pantry plan into action?

To help the family during a difficult time

What is the immediate response of Brock's friends when Carolyn calls out to him during lunch?

They stop talking and stare at Carolyn and her friends

What is Brock's response when asked to meet in front of his house at eight p.m.?

He agrees and says 'Okey-dokey'

What does Carolyn suspect Mary Elizabeth Crenshaw and the O’Shaughnessey twins of?

Involvement in a mystery related to the Girl Scout troop

What does the protagonist feel pressured into doing in exchange for Brock's assistance?

Helping with his math homework

What does the protagonist's father spend his day doing to stay updated about the hostages?

Listening to the radio

What does the protagonist's mother express sympathy for?

The hostages' families

Who does Carolyn enlist to help investigate the mystery related to the Girl Scout troop?

Another friend, Brock

What does the protagonist's friend Carolyn create related to the mystery?

A list of potential suspects

What is the protagonist's daily routine centered around?

Assisting her father with job search tasks

What does the protagonist feel pressured into helping Brock with?

His math homework

What does the father listen to all day to stay updated about the hostages?

Listen to the radio

What does the protagonist's mother express sympathy for?

The hostages' families

Who does Carolyn enlist to help investigate the mystery related to the Girl Scout troop?

Another friend, Brock

What does the protagonist's friend Carolyn create related to the mystery?

A list of potential suspects

What is the primary focus of the story?

The mystery of the missing hamster

What does the news report about the hostages?

The release of thirteen out of sixty-five hostages

What do Carolyn and Cindy suspect Cindy of initially?

Involvement in the missing hamster incident

What is the main occupation of Brock, one of the characters?

Running a pet-sitting business

What drives the plot forward in the story?

The characters' suspicions and investigations

What do Carolyn and Cindy do after reflecting on the situation?

Plan their next steps

Who is ruled out as a suspect in the incident?

Cindy

What is the nature of the unexpected developments in the story?

Misunderstandings and suspicions

What does Brock apologize for?

Throwing tomatoes

What is the focus of the situation at Brock's house?

The missing hamster

What proves Original Cindy's innocence in the incident?

Her success at the horse show

What do Carolyn and the protagonist suspect about the note left at the protagonist's house?

It was left by someone who knows the protagonist's address

What does the protagonist's house lack in comparison to her friends' houses?

Snack foods

What does Carolyn decide to confront Brock about?

The note left at the protagonist's house

What does the protagonist feel unsure about regarding accusing Brock?

Accusing someone without concrete evidence

What does the conversation between Carolyn and Brock reveal?

Tension and suspicion surrounding the accusation

What does Carolyn accuse Brock of during the confrontation?

Leaving a dead hamster on the protagonist's doorstep

How does Brock react to Carolyn's accusation?

Denies leaving the hamster and appears genuinely puzzled

How does the confrontation with Brock end?

Brock denies the accusation and leaves abruptly

What does the protagonist's routine before bed involve?

Warm nonfat milk

What does the protagonist feel about accusing Brock?

Unsure

What does the text highlight about the protagonist's feelings towards detective work?

Lack of enthusiasm and reluctance to accuse without evidence

What plan does Carolyn create to confront Brock?

To catch him off-guard and ask him questions about surfing

What is the reason for Iranian immigrants arriving in America?

To escape persecution by the new government in Iran

What is one strategy used by some Iranian immigrants to avoid discrimination in America?

Adopting Italian identities

Why does Zomorod feel burdened and hesitant to give a presentation about the current events in her country at school?

Due to the events in Iran and discrimination faced in America

What is the protagonist's friend, Carolyn, determined to do in response to the hostile act of leaving a dead hamster on their doorstep?

Find out who left the dead hamster

What broader issue does the story portray?

Challenges and discrimination faced by Iranian immigrants in America during the Iran hostage crisis

What status are many Iranian immigrants granted in the US due to the danger they face in Iran?

Political asylum

What does Zomorod's teacher offer her in exchange for giving the presentation about the current events in her country?

Opportunity to improve her grade

What does the protagonist's family worry about in relation to their relatives in Iran?

Their safety due to government restrictions

What does the story highlight about the discrimination faced by the protagonist's family in America?

A dead hamster left on their doorstep with a note saying 'Iranians go home.'

What does the protagonist feel about giving the presentation at school?

Distressed and burdened

What is the protagonist's friend, Carolyn, determined to do in response to the hostile act of leaving a dead hamster on their doorstep?

Find out who left the dead hamster

What does the story primarily revolve around?

Challenges and discrimination faced by Iranian immigrants in America

What does the protagonist wish for as a Christmas gift?

A job for her father

How does the protagonist describe the atmosphere at home during Christmas?

Depressing

What does the protagonist's mother express feeling embarrassed about?

Being Iranian

What does Brock ask Cindy for help with at lunchtime?

His essay on Of Mice and Men

Where does Brock claim to have found the items on Cindy's list?

In Mrs. Linden's pantry

What does Cindy accuse Carolyn of when Brock turns around to leave?

Causing the situation

What does Cindy tell Carolyn about her decision during their next class together?

She needs to think about it for a few days

What action does the protagonist take at the market to show support?

Buys a sandwich

What is the protagonist's family's situation in Iran?

They are still in Iran

What does the protagonist doubt about their father's reassurance?

His truthfulness when it's frightening

What extreme measures are some people resorting to in Iran?

Taking money and jewelry with them

What does the protagonist feel about their family's safety in America?

Doubtful

What is the protagonist's response to encountering Brock?

Awkwardly offers book recommendations

What is the protagonist's concern about their father's words?

His truthfulness when it's frightening

What does the protagonist witness at the market involving Mrs. Linden?

Demanding a ham she had supposedly won

What does the protagonist do to show support for the market?

Buys a sandwich

What does the protagonist feel about their family's belongings in Iran?

Uncertainty and fear

Why does the protagonist feel empathy for both the managers and Mrs. Linden?

Due to the dramatic confrontation

What does the protagonist encounter at the market involving Brock?

Thanks her for helping him with his English paper

What is the protagonist's motivation for pranking Mrs. Linden?

To empathize with Mrs. Linden and understand her fear of those different from her

What does the protagonist's friend Carolyn fear?

Prejudice and discrimination

What does the protagonist's neighborhood supermarket hold a drawing for?

A free turkey for Thanksgiving and a famous ham for Christmas

What does the protagonist's successful prank on Mrs. Linden demonstrate?

Her willingness to take a stand against prejudice, even if it involves unconventional methods

What does the story primarily highlight about the protagonist?

Her internal conflict between wanting to address discrimination and protecting her family

What is the protagonist's friend Carolyn determined to address?

Discrimination

What does the protagonist's neighborhood supermarket hold a drawing for?

A free turkey for Thanksgiving and a famous ham for Christmas

What does the protagonist's prank on Mrs. Linden reflect about her actions?

Her growing frustration and desire to stand up against prejudice and discrimination

What is the protagonist's primary concern regarding her family?

Protecting them from potential repercussions of addressing discrimination

What does the protagonist's motivation for addressing discrimination reflect?

Her growing determination to combat prejudice and make a difference in her community

What does the protagonist's prank on Mrs. Linden demonstrate about her willingness to address discrimination?

Her willingness to take a stand against prejudice, even if it involves unconventional methods

What does the protagonist's action of lying about their nationality reflect?

Her attempt to protect herself and her family from prejudice

What does Brock impress Cindy with in his essay?

His analysis of the metaphor theme in 'Of Mice and Men'

Why does Cindy feel awkward after helping Brock with his essay?

She contemplates the meaning of the dead hamster in her own life

What does Skip, Brock's father, comment on regarding Cindy's intelligence?

Brock's friends are usually not smart

What does the plumber wear that makes Cindy feel uneasy?

A disturbing T-shirt

What does Cindy contemplate after the plumber starts working on the kitchen leak?

Her own life and the meaning of the dead hamster

What does Brock reveal about his father's occupation?

He owns a golf shop

What does Cindy awkwardly suggest to Brock after acknowledging his intelligence?

He should hang out with her and her friend Carolyn

What does Cindy agree to help Brock with?

His essay, but only as a hint, not by writing it for him

What does Cindy hide from her parents when going to Brock's house?

The real reason for her visit

What does Brock use to cope with sadness?

Surfing

What does Cindy contemplate after facing a plumbing emergency at home?

The meaning of the dead hamster in her own life

What does Brock impress Cindy with in his essay on 'Of Mice and Men'?

His analysis of the metaphor theme in the book

What is the new government in Iran doing to those who became rich under the shah’s regime?

Arresting and killing them without trial

What action does the new government take to honor the Islamic Revolution and erase historical ties to the shah's regime?

Changing the names of streets and institutions

What does the narrator's mother appear to be after moving to America?

More optimistic and confident

What does the narrator keep a secret from her mother about?

A hamster and a note

What does the narrator's family experience after the shah is kicked out of the U.S.?

Financial struggles and job insecurity

What does the narrator's father insist on buying despite financial constraints?

A new bedroom set at Sears

What does the family's visit to Sears reflect?

A solemn atmosphere

What is the narrator's reaction to her father's emotional outburst at Sears?

She defends his character and feels distress

What is the atmosphere during the family's drive home from Sears?

Silent, avoiding discussion of the distressing incident

What does the new government in Iran consider those who became rich under the shah’s regime?

Corrupt and subject to punishment

What is the main focus of the new government's actions to erase historical ties to the shah's regime?

Changing names of streets and institutions

How does the narrator feel about her mother's change in attitude after moving to America?

More optimistic and confident

What is the movie 'A Little Romance' about?

An American girl in Paris who meets a French boy

What is the protagonist's emotional reaction to seeing Kathryn Koob on TV?

She starts to cry

What is the impact of the recurring scene in the protagonist's house?

They watch the news, cry, and then go to separate rooms

Who invites the protagonist to watch 'A Little Romance'?

Howie

What will the new chapter in Rules for Condominium Living be about?

The stories of some of the people who live in the condo community

What does the speaker highlight as the reason for celebrating the neighbors?

Their role in making the place a wonderful place to live

What is the focus of the new chapter, 'Our Community,' in Rules for Condominium Living?

The stories of some of the people who live in the condo community

What is the protagonist's ultimate decision regarding staying in the U.S.?

She decides to stay in the U.S. to pursue her dreams and education

What does the protagonist's mother express reluctance about?

Returning to Iran due to the current situation there

What does the protagonist ultimately decide not to do?

Tell her parents about her decision to stay in the U.S.

Who reassures the protagonist about supporting her education in the U.S. after high school?

Her father

What does the protagonist feel about her decision to stay and pursue her dreams in the U.S.?

Scared but excited

What does Carolyn suggest to the protagonist?

To live with them instead of returning to Iran

What does the protagonist's friend, Carolyn, offer to help with?

To help her with financial issues

What does the protagonist's parents emphasize the importance of?

Family and their support for her

What does the protagonist decide not to share with her parents?

Her decision to stay in the U.S.

What does the protagonist's father reassure her about?

Supporting her education in the U.S. after high school

What does the protagonist's mother express despite the difficult circumstances?

Love and commitment to her

What does the protagonist decide to do after her final decision?

Call her friend to share her decision to stay in the U.S.

What is the primary reason for the pool party organized by Skip?

To celebrate the narrator's father's new job and their stay in America

What does the narrator do at the pool party in relation to Original Cindy's kittens?

Helps Cindy tape flyers for kitten adoption all over the greenbelt

What does Mr. Vitter, a member of the Rotary Club, offer to the narrator's family?

Three interview opportunities through the Rotary Club connections

What is the narrator's father's reaction to the offer of job opportunities through the Rotary Club connections?

Overwhelmed with gratitude and emotion

What does the pool party symbolize for the family?

Their new opportunities and sense of community in America

What is the narrator's father's profession?

Engineer

What does the narrator's father consider due to a story about a friend who went blind after an incident with a cat?

Refusing the narrator's request for a kitten

What does the narrator do to help Original Cindy at the pool party?

Tape flyers for kitten adoption all over the greenbelt

What does the pool party highlight about the family's experience with the Rotary Club and their neighbors?

The potential for support and opportunity in their new community

What does the narrator's family receive through the Rotary Club connections?

Three interview opportunities

What does the pool party symbolize for the family's future?

New job opportunities and a supportive community in America

What does the narrator's family experience with the Rotary Club and their neighbors demonstrate?

The potential for support and opportunity in their new community

What causes conflict between the protagonist and her friend Carolyn?

The protagonist's decision to move back to Iran

Who visits the protagonist to apologize for her past behavior and her mother's actions?

Original Cindy

What does Skip offer to the protagonist when he visits her?

Support

What does the protagonist reflect on regarding her friendship with Original Cindy?

Her journey to find true friends

What ultimately leads the protagonist to decide to move back to Iran?

The limitations she faces as an Iranian

Who reveals that her mother is leaving for Montana and she plans to stay with her dad and pet?

Original Cindy

Who had already disclosed the hateful incident to his father before visiting the protagonist?

Brock

How does the protagonist's father react upon learning about the hateful note left on their doorstep?

With silence

What does Skip try to do despite the negative experience with the hateful note?

Uplift the mood by sharing 'good news'

What does the protagonist feel nostalgic about while packing to move back to Iran?

Missing her old job that she won't have in Iran due to gender restrictions

What does the protagonist feel conflicted about before ultimately deciding to return to Iran?

Leaving the US

What does Original Cindy's mother's hatred and the impact of hate lead to a discussion about?

The impact of hate

What event occurs on January 20, 1981, in the text?

Ronald Reagan's inauguration and the release of U.S. hostages from Iran

What is the primary reason for Zomorod's family's decision to return to Iran?

Financial difficulties in the U.S.

What emotion does Zomorod experience upon learning about her family's decision to return to Iran?

Devastation

What does the text emphasize about Zomorod's internal conflict?

Her sense of injustice and resentment

What is the contrast highlighted in the text?

The joy of the hostage release and Zomorod's family's financial difficulties

What is the protagonist's response to the announcement of the release of U.S. hostages from Iran?

Excitement and relief

What does Zomorod feel towards her Iranian identity?

Resentment

What does Zomorod's family continue to face despite the release of U.S. hostages from Iran?

Financial difficulties

What is Zomorod's father's employment status in the U.S.?

Unemployed

What does Zomorod's family decide to do after her father's job search in the U.S. proves unsuccessful?

Return to Iran

What does Zomorod express towards the idea of leaving her friends in the U.S.?

Overwhelmed with feelings of unfairness

What does Zomorod's family struggle with despite the announcement of the release of U.S. hostages from Iran?

Financial difficulties

Study Notes

Original Cindy and Her Unique Home Decor

  • Original Cindy's home is adorned with framed pictures of horses, a departure from the usual family photos seen in homes.
  • In Iran, people frame pictures of deceased elderly relatives, typically from their older years.
  • Original Cindy is passionate about horseback riding and owns pets, including two kittens, a lizard, and a dog named Mick Jagger.
  • The kittens, Captain and Tennille, are named after her favorite band and song, "Love Will Keep Us Together."
  • Original Cindy expresses surprise when the narrator is unfamiliar with Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones.
  • The narrator and Original Cindy share a favorite song, "Love Will Keep Us Together."
  • The narrator's mother reminds her not to lose the pool key, emphasizing its importance.
  • The condo pool features amenities such as lounge chairs, tables, a barbecue, and a twisty slide.
  • Original Cindy and the narrator discuss sun exposure and the behavior of animals, including horses and seals.
  • Original Cindy shares detailed stories about her horse, Magic, and emphasizes their strong bond and connection.
  • The narrator attempts to connect with Original Cindy through literary references, but the conversation does not resonate with her.
  • Original Cindy dismisses the narrator's literary references but expresses interest in the story of "Black Beauty," a horse's life story set in historical London.

Navigating Identity as an Iranian-American Girl

  • The protagonist, Zomorod, moves to America with her parents and faces challenges due to her Iranian name and heritage.
  • Zomorod struggles with her name, Zomorod, which means "emerald" in Persian, and wishes she had a more common American name like Sara.
  • Zomorod feels embarrassed about her name and tries to fit in by choosing the name Cindy for herself, inspired by a character from The Brady Bunch.
  • Zomorod faces cultural differences as she speaks Persian at home, has only owned a goldfish as a pet, and her mother does not know how to make oatmeal raisin cookies.
  • Zomorod's desire to change her name is driven by her wish to be known for who she is, rather than her Iranian background.
  • Zomorod's encounter with a neighbor named Cindy leads to a moment of connection, as they share the same name, and she is invited to hang out.
  • Zomorod's parents express concern about her integrating into American culture, questioning her about American customs like throwing a pie in someone's face.
  • Zomorod's experience highlights the challenges of fitting in and finding acceptance in a new culture while retaining her Iranian identity.
  • Zomorod's desire to change her name reflects her struggle to navigate her dual identity as an Iranian-American girl.
  • Zomorod's story sheds light on the complexities of immigrant experiences, cultural assimilation, and the quest for belonging.
  • Zomorod's narrative captures the universal themes of identity, belonging, and the challenges of cultural integration faced by many immigrant children.
  • Zomorod's journey reflects the internal conflict of embracing her Iranian heritage while seeking acceptance in American society.

Navigating New School and Cultural Differences

  • The protagonist, originally from Iran, faces questions and stereotypes at a new school in the US
  • The protagonist feels isolated and misunderstood, especially after a classmate makes a rude comment about camels
  • The protagonist finds solace in books and looks forward to the library opening for lunchtime reading
  • The protagonist reflects on their experience moving from Compton to Newport Beach, feeling like an outsider
  • The protagonist compares themselves to a turtle, feeling different from others
  • The protagonist encounters bullying and ridicule, particularly from a group of girls in PE class
  • The protagonist attempts to assert their identity by asking to be called Cindy, but feels further alienated
  • The PE teacher emphasizes the importance of physical exertion with the motto "No pain, no gain"
  • The protagonist expresses a desire for a fresh start and real friendships in their new environment
  • The protagonist dreads the physical activities planned for PE class and wishes for an injury to avoid participation
  • The protagonist experiences cultural and social challenges, struggling to find a sense of belonging
  • The protagonist seeks refuge in books and hopes for a better future in their new environment

Meeting the Williams Family

  • The narrator's father, Mohsen Yousefzadeh, practices his English accent on the way to Carolyn's house, struggling to pronounce "Williams" and considering using the name "George" instead.
  • The neighborhood, Harbor View Hills, is described as very pretty, with real houses and no condos.
  • Mohsen struggles to introduce himself at Carolyn's house, ultimately leaving abruptly out of embarrassment.
  • Carolyn's house is described as lovely, with a wreath adorned with real flowers and lemons on the front door.
  • Carolyn's room is described as having a beanbag chair covered in orange shag, a parakeet named Tweety, and a collection of books including Nancy Drew and Encyclopedia Britannica.
  • The narrator and Carolyn have lunch and chat about school, and the narrator meets Carolyn's straight-A student brother, Matt.
  • After lunch, the girls play Yahtzee and then swim in the pool for two hours, bonding over school and academic achievements.
  • The narrator receives her first "bravo" from Carolyn's mother, and expresses a fondness for Carolyn's family.
  • The narrator and Carolyn often do homework together in Carolyn's family room, in front of their color Zenith TV, while Mrs. Williams irons shirts.
  • The narrator's family has a black-and-white Zenith TV at home, and her father admires the color Zenith TV models at Sears, unable to buy one due to the difference in electricity current in Iran.
  • The narrator watches a report about protests in Iran on the color TV, prompting Carolyn to ask about the shah, to which the narrator compares him to a character from a fairy tale.
  • The text provides insights into the narrator's experiences with cultural differences, friendships, and family dynamics in the context of the Williams family.

New Friends and Cultural Differences

  • The protagonist goes trick-or-treating with her friend Carolyn on Halloween, and she's excited to receive full-size candy bars, which she had never received before in Compton.
  • The neighborhood is filled with kids and parents dressed up for Halloween, creating an exciting atmosphere.
  • The protagonist feels a sense of belonging in Newport Beach and enjoys her classes at Lincoln, even looking forward to the Presidential Physical Fitness Test.
  • The protagonist's father announces that two Iranian brothers, Pooya and Pooyan, are coming to stay with them for two weeks, and she is not happy about it.
  • The concept of "taarof" is explained, where guests can stay for as long as they want, and one must always say yes to a favor to be polite, even if they don't mean it.
  • The protagonist and her father get lost on the way to pick up the brothers from the airport, but eventually, they arrive and bring them home.
  • The brothers give the protagonist's family gifts, including a Persian miniature painting, dried limes, and a box of pistachios.
  • The protagonist finds the brothers' cologne to be overwhelming and tries to cope with the smell during the drive home.
  • The protagonist feels frustrated about not having a say in the decision to host the brothers and dislikes being forced to help with their stay.
  • The protagonist's parents have an authoritarian parenting style, unlike the TV show "The Brady Bunch," where feelings are discussed openly.
  • The protagonist worries about the language barrier and cultural differences with the brothers, as they speak limited English.
  • The protagonist's dislike of the brothers and the looming cultural differences create tension as they begin their stay with the family.

The Challenges of Celebrating Nowruz in America

  • Dr. Klein expresses concern about the situation in Iran, mentioning killings and the danger faced by successful individuals.
  • The protagonist's family celebrates Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, in America, but it is not the same as in Iran.
  • Long-distance calls to Iran are expensive, and the time difference complicates communication with family.
  • The protagonist's mother becomes emotional when speaking to her sisters in Iran, making Nowruz a difficult time for the family in America.
  • The protagonist explains Nowruz traditions to American friends, emphasizing the excitement and non-religious nature of the holiday in Iran.
  • The protagonist's relatives in Iran express fear and caution due to the government listening to long-distance phone calls.
  • The protagonist's longing for her family in Iran is evident as she discusses the challenges of celebrating Nowruz in America with her American friends.
  • The protagonist receives a five-dollar bill as a gift from her father on Nowruz, which she plans to save for college.
  • The protagonist's desire for gifts like gauchos, a pompom belt, and a puka shell necklace reflects the influence of American culture on her Iranian traditions.
  • The protagonist's family is worried about the situation in Iran, with the government's oppressive measures and the danger faced by successful individuals.
  • The protagonist's family faces emotional challenges during Nowruz, with the difficulty of communicating with relatives in Iran and the fear and uncertainty they experience.
  • The protagonist's longing for her family in Iran and the difficulties of celebrating Nowruz in America are highlighted, as she navigates the challenges of maintaining her Iranian traditions in a different cultural context.

Summer Camp Adventures

  • The narrator and her friends arrive at Camp White's Landing on Catalina Island after a boat ride where they see flying fish.
  • They are greeted by camp counselors, mostly Girl Scouts, who ask them to pick camp names and teach them the camp song.
  • The campsite is in an unspoiled part of the island, and the campers are warned about feral pigs and bison on the island.
  • The narrator and her friends struggle to agree on camp names, eventually settling on Sommers, Cleo, and Lentil.
  • The camp is filled with activities like crafts, games, and sports, and the narrator chooses sailing, snorkeling, and canoeing.
  • The narrator's counselor, Rainy, encourages her to become a counselor in training for the following summer.
  • On a different day, the campers discover that feral pigs have invaded their tents, leaving gooey saliva everywhere.
  • Despite the invasion, the narrator becomes increasingly drawn to the idea of becoming a counselor in training and develops a love for sailing.
  • The narrator, originally from Iran, reflects on the differences between her life in the U.S. and the situation for women in her home country.
  • The narrator is inspired by the possibility of becoming a counselor in training and finds happiness in sailing.
  • The text captures the narrator's experiences at summer camp, her interaction with counselors and friends, and her growing passion for sailing.
  • The text also highlights the contrast between the narrator's life in the U.S. and the situation for women in Iran.

First Birthday Party and Camp White's Landing

  • The protagonist's birthday party is described with her friends pelting each other with unbreakable balloons and eating by the pool
  • The protagonist receives gifts from her friends - a pompom belt, a banana-flavored Bonne Bell Lip Smacker, a paint-by-numbers set, and a Clue game
  • The protagonist wants to attend Camp White's Landing but her parents are concerned about the safety, particularly involving horseback riding
  • The protagonist convinces her parents to let her go to camp by promising to be extra careful and not go anywhere alone or in the dark
  • The protagonist expresses excitement about going to summer camp for the first time and is not scared at all
  • The protagonist and her friends make promises to their parents about things they wouldn't do at camp
  • The protagonist wears a floppy sun hat given by her mom to prevent sunburn
  • On the ferry to camp, the protagonist and her friends explore the boat and encounter tourists staring at them
  • The protagonist and her friends see dolphins in the wild while on the ferry, making it the best day of her life
  • The protagonist and her friends are excited about the prospect of having fun at camp
  • The story is narrated in first person, with the protagonist expressing her thoughts and interactions with her friends and parents
  • The text captures the protagonist's coming-of-age experiences, including her first birthday party without her parents and her first time away from home at summer camp

Life in America for Iranian Immigrants

  • Iranian immigrants are arriving in America due to fear of persecution by the new government in Iran.
  • Some immigrants are wealthy enough to buy homes and set up businesses, while others escape with only their lives.
  • Many are granted political asylum in the US due to the danger they face in Iran.
  • Some Iranians, like Pooya and his friend, adopt Italian identities to avoid discrimination in America.
  • The protagonist's family experiences discrimination and hostility in America, as evidenced by a dead hamster left on their doorstep with a note saying "Iranians go home."
  • The protagonist, Zomorod, feels burdened by the events in Iran and is hesitant to give a presentation about the current events in her country at school.
  • Zomorod's teacher offers her the opportunity to improve her grade by giving the presentation, but Zomorod declines.
  • Zomorod is distressed by the hostile act and is unsure why her family has been targeted.
  • Zomorod's friend, Carolyn, is determined to find out who left the dead hamster and is supportive of Zomorod.
  • The story portrays the challenges and discrimination faced by Iranian immigrants in America during the Iran hostage crisis.
  • Zomorod's family worries about their relatives in Iran and faces the difficulty of leaving the country due to government restrictions.
  • The protagonist's experiences reflect the broader issues faced by Iranian immigrants in America during a tumultuous period in Iranian history.

Unexpected Conversations and a Plumbing Emergency

  • Cindy agrees to help Brock with his essay, but only as a hint, not by writing it for him
  • Cindy is surprised by Brock's intelligence and realizes he acts less smart than he is
  • Cindy goes to Brock's house to help with the essay, hiding the real reason from her parents
  • Brock's father, Skip, comments on Cindy's intelligence, mentioning that Brock's friends are usually not smart
  • Brock reveals that his father is home during the day because he owns a golf shop
  • Brock and Cindy discuss the book "Of Mice and Men" and its depressing nature, and Brock's surfing to cope with sadness
  • Brock impresses Cindy with his essay on the metaphor theme in the book, using the dead animals as a metaphor for dreams dying
  • Cindy encourages Brock and acknowledges his intelligence, and awkwardly suggests he should hang out with her and her friend Carolyn
  • Cindy helps Brock with the essay and leaves feeling awkward, contemplating the meaning of the dead hamster in her own life
  • Cindy faces a plumbing emergency at home and has to call a plumber, who arrives wearing a disturbing T-shirt
  • Cindy feels uneasy and unsure how to handle the plumber's presence due to his offensive T-shirt
  • The plumber starts working on the kitchen leak, and Cindy worries about her mother's interaction with him

Life in Iran After the Islamic Revolution

  • Doctors in Iran are wealthy due to their hard work, but the new government considers those who became rich under the shah’s regime as corrupt and subject to punishment.
  • High-ranking Iranians who worked with the shah are being arrested and killed without trial, and their assets are being seized.
  • The new government is changing the names of streets and institutions to honor the Islamic Revolution, erasing historical ties to the shah's regime.
  • Iranian families in America seek advice on living in the U.S., expressing concerns about American kids, drugs, and alcohol.
  • The narrator's mother, depressed in Iran, appears more optimistic and confident in America, offering guidance to newly arrived Iranian families.
  • The narrator keeps a secret from her mother about a hamster and a note, to prevent it from ruining her perception of America.
  • The narrator encounters Brock, who asks for a book recommendation for his trip to Mexico, but she struggles to think of one.
  • The narrator's family experiences hardship after the shah is kicked out of the U.S., leading to financial struggles and job insecurity.
  • The narrator's father, struggling to find a job, insists on buying a new bedroom set at Sears despite financial constraints.
  • The family's visit to Sears is solemn, and the father's outburst in Persian about the hostage takers and the revolution scares the narrator.
  • The father's emotional outburst at Sears is uncharacteristic, leading the narrator to defend his character and feel distress about their situation.
  • The family drives home in silence, avoiding discussion of the distressing incident at Sears, reflecting the challenges they face.

Life in the United States and the Iranian Hostage Crisis

  • Zomorod and her friends are dropped off at the theater by Mrs. Howard and enjoy snacks before watching a movie.
  • Carolyn teases Zomorod about her crush on Brock, sparking a lighthearted conversation among the friends.
  • They discuss the movie and ideal boys, with Mrs. Howard picking them up and joking about dating boxers.
  • They laugh and chat about boys from their school on the way home.
  • On January 20, 1981, they watch Ronald Reagan's inauguration and the announcement of the release of U.S. hostages from Iran.
  • Zomorod's family is relieved, but their struggles continue, as her father is still unemployed and they are facing financial difficulties.
  • Zomorod's father informs her that they are returning to Iran, as he has not found a job in the U.S.
  • Zomorod is devastated by the news and feels that her life is over, expressing her anger and frustration.
  • She despairs over returning to a country with limited freedoms and feels resentment towards her parents and her Iranian identity.
  • Zomorod is overwhelmed with feelings of unfairness and struggles with the idea of leaving her friends in the U.S.
  • The text highlights the contrast between the joy of the hostage release and the challenges faced by Zomorod's family in the U.S.
  • It also portrays Zomorod's internal conflict and sense of injustice as she grapples with the prospect of returning to Iran.

Explore the challenges of cultural assimilation, dual identity, and the quest for belonging through a series of narratives and encounters with Iranian-American characters. Delve into the complexities of immigrant experiences, cultural differences, and the navigation of unique identities in various settings.

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