Verb Tenses in English Grammar

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12 Questions

Which tense is used to describe actions that are true in general, habitual, or happening now?

Present Tense

What is a clause that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence?

Dependent Clause

What type of clause begins with a relative pronoun (who, which, that, etc.)?

Relative Clause

What type of clause begins with a subordinating conjunction (because, although, if, etc.)?

Subordinate Clause

What is the correct form of the present perfect tense for the verb 'go'?

I have gone

What is the correct form of the future perfect continuous tense for the verb 'do'?

I will have been doing

Which of the following modal verbs expresses permission or possibility?

May

What is the main problem with the sentence 'Me and my friend.'?

It lacks a verb

Which of the following sentences is in the passive voice?

The man was bitten by the dog.

What is the main reason to use the passive voice in scientific or technical writing?

To focus on the action's recipient

Which of the following modal verbs expresses ability or permission in the past?

Could

How can you correct a sentence fragment?

Add a subject or verb to the fragment

Study Notes

Verb Tenses

  • Present Tense: used to describe actions that are true in general, habitual, or happening now
    • Simple: I go, I do, I eat
    • Progressive: I am going, I am doing, I am eating
    • Perfect: I have gone, I have done, I have eaten
    • Perfect Continuous: I have been going, I have been doing, I have been eating
  • Past Tense: used to describe completed actions
    • Simple: I went, I did, I ate
    • Progressive: I was going, I was doing, I was eating
    • Perfect: I had gone, I had done, I had eaten
    • Perfect Continuous: I had been going, I had been doing, I had been eating
  • Future Tense: used to describe future actions
    • Simple: I will go, I will do, I will eat
    • Progressive: I will be going, I will be doing, I will be eating
    • Perfect: I will have gone, I will have done, I will have eaten
    • Perfect Continuous: I will have been going, I will have been doing, I will have been eating

Clause Structure

  • Independent Clause: a complete sentence with a subject and a verb
    • Example: I went to the store.
  • Dependent Clause: a clause that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence
    • Example: because I needed milk
  • Relative Clause: a dependent clause that begins with a relative pronoun (who, which, that, etc.)
    • Example: The book, which is on the table, is mine.
  • Subordinate Clause: a dependent clause that begins with a subordinating conjunction (because, although, if, etc.)
    • Example: I went to the store because I needed milk.
  • Modal Verbs: verbs that express possibility, necessity, or obligation
    • Can: ability or permission
    • Could: ability or permission in the past
    • May: permission or possibility
    • Might: possibility
    • Shall: intention or obligation
    • Should: obligation or advice
    • Will: intention or prediction
    • Would: intention or obligation in the past

Sentence Fragments

  • Sentence Fragments: incomplete sentences that lack a subject, verb, or both
    • Examples: Me and my friend. (lacking a verb) / Under the bridge. (lacking a subject and verb)
  • How to correct sentence fragments:
    • Add a subject or verb to the fragment
    • Combine the fragment with an independent clause

Passive Voice

  • Active Voice: the subject performs the action
    • Example: The dog bites the man.
  • Passive Voice: the subject receives the action
    • Example: The man was bitten by the dog.
  • When to use passive voice:
    • When the doer of the action is unknown or unimportant
    • When the focus is on the action's recipient
    • In scientific or technical writing

Verb Tenses

  • Present Tense: describes actions that are true in general, habitual, or happening now
  • Present Tense forms:
    • Simple: I go, I do, I eat
    • Progressive: I am going, I am doing, I am eating
    • Perfect: I have gone, I have done, I have eaten
    • Perfect Continuous: I have been going, I have been doing, I have been eating
  • Past Tense: describes completed actions
  • Past Tense forms:
    • Simple: I went, I did, I ate
    • Progressive: I was going, I was doing, I was eating
    • Perfect: I had gone, I had done, I had eaten
    • Perfect Continuous: I had been going, I had been doing, I had been eating
  • Future Tense: describes future actions
  • Future Tense forms:
    • Simple: I will go, I will do, I will eat
    • Progressive: I will be going, I will be doing, I will be eating
    • Perfect: I will have gone, I will have done, I will have eaten
    • Perfect Continuous: I will have been going, I will have been doing, I will have been eating

Clause Structure

  • Independent Clause: a complete sentence with a subject and a verb
  • Dependent Clause: a clause that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence
  • Relative Clause: a dependent clause that begins with a relative pronoun (who, which, that, etc.)
  • Subordinate Clause: a dependent clause that begins with a subordinating conjunction (because, although, if, etc.)
  • Modal Verbs: verbs that express possibility, necessity, or obligation
  • Can: ability or permission
  • Could: ability or permission in the past
  • May: permission or possibility
  • Might: possibility
  • Shall: intention or obligation
  • Should: obligation or advice
  • Will: intention or prediction
  • Would: intention or obligation in the past

Sentence Fragments

  • Sentence Fragments: incomplete sentences that lack a subject, verb, or both
  • Examples: Me and my friend. (lacking a verb) / Under the bridge. (lacking a subject and verb)
  • How to correct sentence fragments:
    • Add a subject or verb to the fragment
    • Combine the fragment with an independent clause

Passive Voice

  • Active Voice: the subject performs the action
  • Passive Voice: the subject receives the action
  • When to use passive voice:
    • When the doer of the action is unknown or unimportant
    • When the focus is on the action's recipient
    • In scientific or technical writing

Understand the concept of verb tenses in English grammar, including present, past, and their different forms like simple, progressive, perfect, and perfect continuous.

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