Cell Injury and Necrosis Quiz

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17 Questions

Which process involves programmed cell death as a response to cellular stress or DNA damage?

Necroptosis

Which type of cell death is associated with the release of pro-inflammatory intracellular contents and the formation of inflammasomes?

Pyroptosis

What is the gross appearance of fibrinoid necrosis?

Unchanged

What does fibrinoid necrosis indicate?

Severe vascular injury

What does fibrinoid convert to as it loses water?

Hyaline

What is the composition of fibrinoid?

Fibrin, collagen, and vessel wall components

Which type of necrosis is characterized by preservation of cellular outlines and tissue architecture?

Coagulative necrosis

What is the distinct form of necrosis typically caused by microorganisms like M. tuberculosis?

Caseous necrosis

What type of necrosis results from abnormal release of activated pancreatic enzymes?

Enzymatic fat necrosis

Which type of necrosis can mimic breast carcinoma and is typically caused by blunt breast trauma or needling procedures?

Traumatic fat necrosis

What is the clinical term for necrosis of organs in contact with the environment?

Gangrenous necrosis

Which type of necrosis is characterized by the loss of cell outlines and tissue architecture, leading to the formation of cavities?

Liquefactive necrosis

What are the three types of nuclear changes presented by necrosis?

Karyolysis, pyknosis, karyorrhexis

Which mechanism of cell injury and necrosis involves the generation of free radicals?

Generation of free radicals

What is the programmed cell death affecting single cells in both physiological and pathological conditions?

Apoptosis

What are the causes of cell injury and necrosis?

Hypoxia, microorganisms, chemical agents

What type of necrosis is commonly caused by ischemia and triggers an inflammatory response?

Coagulative necrosis

Study Notes

Cell Injury and Necrosis: Key Concepts

  • Necrosis is irreversible injury leading to cellular "homicide" in living tissues, while apoptosis is programmed cell death affecting single cells in both physiological and pathological conditions.
  • Causes of cell injury and necrosis include hypoxia, microorganisms, chemical agents, physical agents, immunologic reactions, genetic derangements, and nutritional imbalances.
  • Mechanisms of cell injury and necrosis involve ATP depletion, mitochondrial damage, generation of free radicals, reperfusion injury, membrane damage, calcium influx, and DNA damage.
  • Necrosis presents three types of nuclear changes: karyolysis, pyknosis, and karyorrhexis, with distinct morphologic features.
  • Necrosis can manifest as coagulative, liquefactive, gangrenous, caseous, fat, or fibrinoid necrosis, each with specific etiologies and outcomes.
  • Coagulative necrosis is characterized by preservation of cellular outlines and tissue architecture, commonly caused by ischemia, and triggers an inflammatory response.
  • Liquefactive necrosis results in the loss of cell outlines and tissue architecture, leading to the formation of cavities, and can be caused by ischemia or infections.
  • Gangrenous necrosis is a clinical term for necrosis of organs in contact with the environment, with necrotic changes that can be coagulative or liquefactive in nature.
  • Caseous necrosis is a distinct form of necrosis with loss of tissue architecture and cellular outlines, typically caused by microorganisms like M. tuberculosis.
  • Enzymatic fat necrosis results from abnormal release of activated pancreatic enzymes, while traumatic fat necrosis is caused by mechanical trauma.
  • Traumatic fat necrosis can mimic breast carcinoma and typically results from blunt breast trauma or needling procedures.
  • Fat necrosis presents with chalky-white calcium deposits on gross appearance and characteristic histological features.

Test your understanding of cell injury and necrosis with this quiz covering key concepts such as causes, mechanisms, morphological changes, and specific types of necrosis. Identify different types of necrosis and their etiologies while learning about the distinct characteristics of each.

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