Liquid State of Matter: Surface Tension and Fluid Pressure
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Liquid State of Matter: Surface Tension and Fluid Pressure

Test your understanding of the properties of liquids, including surface tension and fluid pressure. Learn about the causes and effects of surface tension, and the characteristics of fluid pressure, including Pascal's Principle.

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@PlayfulMedusa

Questions and Answers

Surface tension is a property of solids that causes it to behave as if it has an 'elastic skin' at its surface.

False

The difference in cohesion between molecules at the surface and those in the bulk of the liquid is a cause of surface tension.

True

Fluid pressure is the pressure exerted by a solid on an object or surface in contact with it.

False

Pressure in a fluid increases with an increase in the density of the fluid.

<p>True</p> Signup and view all the answers

Pascal's Principle states that a change in pressure at any point in a confined fluid is transmitted diminished throughout the fluid.

<p>False</p> Signup and view all the answers

Surface tension enables the formation of spheres and cubes.

<p>False</p> Signup and view all the answers

Study Notes

Liquid State of Matter

Surface Tension

  • Definition: The property of a liquid that causes it to behave as if it has an "elastic skin" at its surface, resulting in a force that acts along the surface of the liquid
  • Causes:
    • Inter molecular forces between liquid molecules at the surface
    • Difference in cohesion between molecules at the surface and those in the bulk of the liquid
  • Effects:
    • Causes the surface of the liquid to behave as if it is "stretched"
    • Minimizes the surface area of the liquid
    • Allows some insects to walk on water
    • Enables the formation of droplets and bubbles

Fluid Pressure

  • Definition: The pressure exerted by a fluid (liquid or gas) on an object or surface in contact with it
  • Characteristics:
    • Pressure increases with depth
    • Pressure is transmitted equally in all directions
    • Pressure is proportional to the density of the fluid
  • Pascal's Principle:
    • A change in pressure at any point in a confined fluid is transmitted undiminished throughout the fluid
    • Allows for the multiplication of force in hydraulic systems

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