Interpreting Biblical Narratives: Rahab's Story

CatchyBlankVerse avatar
CatchyBlankVerse
·
·
Download

Start Quiz

Study Flashcards

30 Questions

The author believes the text should be interpreted figuratively.

False

The author is uncertain about the literal or figurative interpretation of the text.

False

Yahweh is able to control natural processes according to the author.

True

The author knows exactly how God performed the miracles described in the text.

False

The author believes that the text can be explained by natural processes alone.

False

The author thinks that God's ability to control natural processes is an important aspect of the text.

True

Rahab's declaration of faith in Joshua chapter 2 is motivated by her fear of the Israelites.

False

The Israelites' conquest of the Promised Land is a live issue in many people's daily lives.

False

The Abrahamic covenants are a central theme in Joshua chapter 2.

False

Rahab believes that the Canaanites will ultimately defeat the Israelites.

False

Joshua chapter 2 presents a significant interpretive challenge for laypeople due to its historical narrative.

True

The people in the passage are more interested in the nature of Israel's conquest than Rahab's declaration of faith.

False

According to the narrator, Rahab's words match the events that happened.

False

The Holy Spirit led the author to omit Rahab's exact words in the narrative.

False

The narrator's goal is to emphasize Rahab's faith by omitting her role in putting the king of Jericho on the wrong path.

False

A non-believer who knows nothing about the Torah can still identify the conflict between the narrator's words and Rahab's words.

True

The postmodern society would not be able to identify the disconnect between the narrator's words and Rahab's words.

False

The author of the narrative is trying to make Rahab look innocent by not including her exact words.

False

The Lord commended Rahab's faith and lie.

False

The Ten Commandments are applied using situational ethics.

False

Rahab lived in the time of the judges in Israel.

True

The Ten Commandments are meant to be applied only to children.

False

The conquest of Canaan is a purely academic issue.

False

The Abrahamic covenant is not relevant to the story of Rahab.

False

The narrator emphasizes Rahab's lie over her testimony in the text.

False

The author suggests that Rahab's story is an easy situation to deal with.

False

The emphasis of the narrative is on Rahab's faith and testimony.

True

The author believes that the problem of Rahab's lie is adequately addressed by emphasizing her faith.

False

The story of Rahab is similar to that of the two midwives in Exodus chapter 1.

True

Davis and Wister are mentioned as writers of poor commentaries on the topic.

False

Explore the biblical account of Rahab and how to evaluate the narrative. This quiz delves into the interpretation of the text, considering the narrator's perspective and the character's words. It's a thought-provoking exercise that can be applied to any literary analysis.

Make Your Own Quizzes and Flashcards

Convert your notes into interactive study material.

Use Quizgecko on...
Browser
Browser