Instrument Approach Procedures: Understanding MDA and DA
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Instrument Approach Procedures: Understanding MDA and DA

Test your knowledge of instrument approach procedures, including the differences between Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA) and Decision Altitude (DA), and how to apply them in various types of approaches, such as ILS, Localizer, and RNAV. Learn how to avoid common mistakes during instrument checkrides. This quiz is essential for pilots and aviation enthusiasts alike.

Created by
@EvaluativeTopaz

Questions and Answers

What is the primary difference between Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA) and Decision Altitude (DA)?

MDA is a hard minimum altitude, whereas DA is a decision point

In an ILS approach, what is the minimum altitude?

Decision Altitude (DA)

What is the purpose of the Visual Descent Point (VDP) in a non-precision approach?

To decide when to execute a missed approach

What is the required scale deflection for vertical and lateral guidance in a precision approach?

<p>Three-quarter scale deflection</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is the buffer required for the Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA) in a non-precision approach?

<p>+100 feet and -0 feet</p> Signup and view all the answers

What is critical for pilots to brief themselves on to avoid common mistakes during instrument checkrides?

<p>The type of approach guidance being used</p> Signup and view all the answers

Study Notes

  • Instrument approach failures often occur due to misunderstanding of altitude minimums, specifically distinguishing between Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA) and Decision Altitude (DA).

  • MDA is a hard minimum altitude, whereas DA is a decision point to decide whether to continue descent or execute a missed approach.

  • In an ILS (Instrument Landing System) approach, the minimum altitude is a Decision Altitude, allowing pilots to descend below it briefly while executing a missed approach.

  • In a Localizer approach, the minimum altitude is a Minimum Descent Altitude, and pilots must maintain it until the missed approach point.

  • The Visual Descent Point (VDP) is an indicator of when to decide to execute a missed approach in a non-precision approach.

  • Precision approaches, like ILS, require maintaining no more than a three-quarter scale deflection of the vertical and lateral guidance.

  • Non-precision approaches, like Localizer, require maintaining the MDA with a buffer of +100 feet and -0 feet.

  • In an RNAV (Area Navigation) approach, pilots must know the type of guidance being used to determine whether the minimum altitude is a DA or MDA.

  • Different types of approach guidance, such as LPV (Localizer Performance with Vertical Guidance) and LNAV (Localizer Navigation), have distinct minimum altitudes.

  • Pilots must brief themselves on the type of approach and minimum altitude to avoid common mistakes during instrument checkrides.

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