English Linking Words Pronunciation

WellBredBinary avatar
WellBredBinary
·
·
Download

Start Quiz

Study Flashcards

10 Questions

What is the purpose of linking words in English?

To reduce pauses between words when speaking

Which type of linking involves connecting words with shared consonant sounds?

Consonant-consonant linking

In which type of linking do we add a consonant sound between two vowel sounds?

Vowel-vowel linking

What is an exception in linking as mentioned in the text?

/tʃ/ and /dʒ/ sounds cannot be linked

Which of the following is NOT a similar consonant sound that can be linked?

/p/ and /s/

What should be the focus when practicing pronouncing the links?

Consonant sounds, not spelling

Which type of linking occurs when one word ends with a consonant sound and the next word begins with a vowel sound?

Consonant-vowel linking

What does Gina emphasize as important when pronouncing the links?

The rhythm of speech

What is the purpose of vowel-vowel linking?

To reduce pauses between words when speaking

Which two consonant sounds can be linked according to the examples provided?

/p/ and /v/

Study Notes

  • Gina, an instructor from Oxford Online English, explains the importance of linking words for reading fluency and natural pronunciation in English.
  • Linking is the way to connect words with shared sounds when speaking, reducing pauses between words.
  • Consonant-consonant linking: when one word ends with a consonant sound and the next word starts with the same consonant sound, they share the sound. Examples: "red dress," "cheap places," and "feel lucky."
  • Consonant-vowel linking: when one word ends with a consonant sound, and the next word begins with a vowel sound, link the consonant to the vowel. Examples: "Do you remember that time when Anna and Amy fell in the swimming pool?"
  • Vowel-vowel linking: link two vowel sounds by adding a consonant sound between them. Examples: "He asked for a glass of water," "He asked" and "a glass of water" share the /j/ sound.
  • Exceptions in linking: we do not link /tʃ/ or /dʒ/ sounds. Examples: "each choice," "orange juice."
  • Similar consonant sounds can be linked, such as "/d/" and "/t/," "/k/" and "/g/," "/p/" and "/b/," and "/f/" and "/v/." Examples: "I need two kilos of shrimp," "The water was a kind of dark green colour," and "I sleep better if the room’s really dark."
  • Practice pronouncing the links by focusing on the sounds, not the spelling, and imagining the consonant belongs to the second word.
  • English learners might find it helpful to imagine the consonant at the start of the second word when struggling with consonant-vowel links.
  • The text also includes a review of the three basic ways to link words: consonant-consonant, consonant-vowel, and vowel-vowel.

Learn about the importance of linking words for reading fluency and natural pronunciation in English. Understand the three basic ways to link words: consonant-consonant, consonant-vowel, and vowel-vowel, along with exceptions. Practice pronouncing the links by focusing on sounds and imagining the consonant belonging to the second word.

Make Your Own Quizzes and Flashcards

Convert your notes into interactive study material.

Use Quizgecko on...
Browser
Browser