Coordination Compounds in Inorganic Chemistry

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10 Questions

Chlorophyll is a coordination compound of magnesium.

True

Haemoglobin is a coordination compound of iron.

True

Vitamin B12 is a coordination compound of copper.

False

Coordination compounds are not utilized in metallurgical processes.

False

Industrial catalysts do not involve the use of coordination compounds.

False

Alfred Werner was an Italian chemist who formulated his ideas about the structures of coordination compounds.

False

The primary valences in coordination compounds are non-ionizable and are satisfied by neutral molecules or negative ions.

False

In coordination compounds, the secondary valence is equal to the coordination number and is fixed for a metal.

True

According to Werner's theory, metals in coordination compounds show three types of linkages: primary, secondary, and tertiary.

False

Isomers in coordination compounds have identical properties despite having different empirical formulas.

True

Study Notes

Introduction to Coordination Compounds

  • Transition metals form complex compounds with anions or neutral molecules by sharing electrons, known as coordination compounds.
  • Coordination compounds are vital components of biological systems, such as chlorophyll, haemoglobin, and vitamin B12.

Importance of Coordination Compounds

  • Coordination compounds have various applications in:
    • Metallurgical processes
    • Industrial catalysts
    • Analytical reagents
    • Electroplating
    • Textile dyeing
    • Medicinal chemistry

Objectives of Studying Coordination Compounds

  • Understand the postulates of Werner's theory of coordination compounds
  • Learn the definitions of key terms, such as coordination entity, central atom/ion, ligand, coordination number, coordination sphere, and oxidation number
  • Understand the rules of nomenclature of coordination compounds
  • Learn to write formulas and names of mononuclear coordination compounds
  • Define different types of isomerism in coordination compounds
  • Understand the nature of bonding in coordination compounds in terms of Valence Bond and Crystal Field theories
  • Appreciate the importance and applications of coordination compounds in daily life

Alfred Werner and His Theory

  • Alfred Werner, a Swiss chemist, formulated his ideas about the structures of coordination compounds
  • Werner proposed the concept of primary and secondary valences for a metal ion
  • He prepared and characterized many coordination compounds and studied their physical and chemical behavior

Werner's Theory of Coordination Compounds

  • Werner's theory explains the structures of coordination compounds
  • The main postulates of the theory are:
    • Metals show two types of linkages (valences): primary and secondary
    • Primary valences are normally ionizable and are satisfied by negative ions
    • Secondary valences are non-ionizable and are satisfied by neutral molecules or negative ions
    • The secondary valence is equal to the coordination number and is fixed for a metal

Explore the world of coordination compounds in inorganic chemistry, where transition metals form complex compounds by sharing electrons with anions or neutral molecules. Learn about new concepts of chemical bonding and molecular structure in this challenging area of modern chemistry.

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