COLLISION REGULATIONS PART D: Sound and Light Signals

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Match the following vessel lengths with their corresponding sound signaling devices:

< 12m = some type of sound signaling device < 100m = whistle and bell

= 100m = whistle, bell, and gong any length = no sound signaling device required

Match the following maneuvers with their corresponding whistle signals:

Altering course to starboard = one short blast Altering course to port = two short blasts Operating astern propulsion = three short blasts Stopped = no whistle signal required

Match the following terms with their definitions according to Rule 32 of Collision Regulations:

Whistle = Any sound signalling appliance capable of producing the prescribed blasts Short blast = A blast of from four to six seconds' duration Prolonged blast = A blast of about one second's duration Gong = A signal exchanged by a power-driven vessel and another vessel

Match the following equipment with their respective uses:

Whistle = used on vessels >= 100m in length Bell = used on vessels < 100m in length Gong = used on vessels >= 100m in length Some type of sound signaling device = used on vessels < 12m in length

Match the following vessels with their required sound signal equipment according to Rule 33:

Vessel of 12 metres or more in length = Whistle Vessel of 20 metres or more in length = Bell and whistle Vessel of 100 metres or more in length = Whistle, bell, and gong Vessel of 5 metres or more in length = Bell

Match the following statements with their correct explanations:

Operating astern propulsion means moving astern = false A power-driven vessel must indicate its maneuver with a whistle signal = true A vessel < 12m in length must carry a whistle = false A vessel >= 100m in length must carry a bell and a whistle = true

Match the following signals with their descriptions according to Rule 32:

Whistle = A signal exchanged by a power-driven vessel and another vessel Signal of action = Signals sounded upon rudder order International Rule signal = Signals exchanged if vessels are 'in sight' and maneuvering is required Rudder order signal = Signals sounded by a vessel in an area of restricted visibility

Match the following terms with their descriptions according to Rule 33:

Whistle = Complies with the specifications in Annex III Bell = Used in addition to a whistle on vessels of 20 metres or more in length Gong = Used in addition to a bell and whistle on vessels of 100 metres or more in length Rudder = Used to steer a vessel

Match the following vessel lengths with their respective sound signaling requirements:

< 12m = no specific requirement < 100m = whistle and bell required

= 100m = whistle, bell, and gong required any length = no sound signaling device required

Match the following whistle signals with their respective meanings:

One short blast = altering course to starboard Two short blasts = altering course to port Three short blasts = operating astern propulsion No whistle signal = vessel is stopped

Match the following situations with the sound signals used according to Rule 34:

Vessels in sight of one another = International Rule signals Vessels in an area of restricted visibility = Signals sounded upon rudder order Vessels maneuvering = Signals exchanged between vessels Vessels in a narrow channel = Signals sounded by a power-driven vessel

Match the following vessels with their additional sound signal equipment according to Rule 33:

Vessel of 20 metres or more in length = Bell Vessel of 100 metres or more in length = Gong Vessel of 12 metres or more in length = Gong Vessel of 5 metres or more in length = Bell and gong

Match the situations with the corresponding sound signals in restricted visibility:

A vessel at anchor = Ringing the bell rapidly for about 5 seconds A pushing vessel and a vessel being pushed ahead = Signals prescribed in paragraphs (a) or (b) of Rule 35 A vessel aground = Three separate and distinct strokes on the bell before and after the rapid ringing of the bell A power-driven vessel = No specific sound signal mentioned

Match the signals with the corresponding vessels in restricted visibility:

Ringing the bell rapidly for about 5 seconds = A vessel at anchor Signals prescribed in paragraphs (a) or (b) of Rule 35 = A pushing vessel and a vessel being pushed ahead Three separate and distinct strokes on the bell before and after the rapid ringing of the bell = A vessel aground No specific sound signal mentioned = A power-driven vessel

Match the vessels with the corresponding signals in restricted visibility:

A vessel at anchor = Ringing the bell and gong in forepart and after part of the vessel A pushing vessel and a vessel being pushed ahead = Signals prescribed in paragraphs (a) or (b) of Rule 35 A vessel aground = Three separate and distinct strokes on the bell before and after the rapid ringing of the bell and an appropriate whistle signal A power-driven vessel = No specific sound signal mentioned

Match the signals with the corresponding descriptions in restricted visibility:

Ringing the bell rapidly for about 5 seconds = To give warning of her position and of the possibility of collision to an approaching vessel Signals prescribed in paragraphs (a) or (b) of Rule 35 = For a power-driven vessel Three separate and distinct strokes on the bell before and after the rapid ringing of the bell = For a vessel aground Three blasts in succession (one short, one prolonged and one short blast) = To give warning of her position and of the possibility of collision to an approaching vessel

Match the situations with the corresponding additional signals in restricted visibility:

A vessel at anchor = Three blasts in succession (one short, one prolonged and one short blast) A pushing vessel and a vessel being pushed ahead = No additional signal mentioned A vessel aground = An appropriate whistle signal A power-driven vessel = No specific additional signal mentioned

Match the vessels with the corresponding parts of the vessel where the bell is sounded in restricted visibility:

A vessel at anchor = Forepart of the vessel A pushing vessel and a vessel being pushed ahead = No specific part of the vessel mentioned A vessel aground = Forepart and after part of the vessel A vessel of 100 metres or more in length = Forepart of the vessel

Match the following vessel lengths with their corresponding sound signal intervals:

Less than 12 metres = Not more than 2 minutes 12 metres or more but less than 20 metres = Not more than 2 minutes 20 metres or more = No specific interval Pilot vessel = No specific interval

Match the following vessels with their sound signal obligations:

Vessel of 12 metres or more but less than 20 metres = Not obliged to give bell signals Vessel of less than 12 metres = Not obliged to give any signals Pilot vessel = Additional identity signal All vessels = Obliged to give bell signals

Match the following sound signals with their vessels:

Bell signals = Vessel of 12 metres or more but less than 20 metres Efficient sound signal = Vessel of less than 12 metres Four short blasts = Pilot vessel Whistle signals = All vessels

Match the following situations with their sound signal requirements:

Restricted visibility = Efficient sound signal at intervals of not more than 2 minutes Pilotage duty = Additional identity signal Daytime = No sound signals required Anchored vessel = Special anchor signal

Match the following vessels with their sound signal exemptions:

Vessel of less than 12 metres = Exempt from bell signals Vessel of 12 metres or more but less than 20 metres = Exempt from whistle signals Pilot vessel = Exempt from all sound signals All vessels = No exemptions

Match the type of vessel with the sound signal it should make in restricted visibility:

A vessel not under command = One prolonged followed by two short blasts A power-driven vessel underway but stopped and making no way through the water = Two prolonged blasts in succession A vessel towed = One prolonged followed by three short blasts A vessel engaged in fishing, when at anchor = One prolonged blast

Match the type of vessel with the sound signal it should make in restricted visibility:

A sailing vessel = Three blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by two short blasts A vessel restricted in her ability to manoeuvre = Two prolonged blasts in succession A vessel engaged in towing or pushing another vessel = One prolonged blast followed by two short blasts A vessel constrained by her draught = One prolonged blast followed by three short blasts

Match the type of vessel with the sound signal it should make in restricted visibility:

A vessel towed or if more than one vessel is towed the last vessel of the tow = Four blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by three short blasts A vessel engaged in fishing, when at anchor = Three blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by two short blasts A vessel restricted in her ability to manoeuvre when carrying out her work at anchor = One prolonged followed by two short blasts A power-driven vessel underway but stopped and making no way through the water = One prolonged blast followed by two short blasts

Match the type of vessel with the sound signal it should make in restricted visibility:

A vessel engaged in towing or pushing another vessel = Three blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by two short blasts A power-driven vessel underway but stopped and making no way through the water = Two prolonged blasts in succession A vessel not under command = One prolonged blast followed by three short blasts A vessel constrained by her draught = Four blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by three short blasts

Match the type of vessel with the sound signal it should make in restricted visibility:

A vessel engaged in fishing = One prolonged blast followed by two short blasts A vessel restricted in her ability to manoeuvre = Three blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by two short blasts A sailing vessel = Four blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by three short blasts A vessel towed or if more than one vessel is towed the last vessel of the tow = Two prolonged blasts in succession

Match the type of vessel with the sound signal it should make in restricted visibility:

A vessel engaged in fishing, when at anchor = Three blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by two short blasts A vessel restricted in her ability to manoeuvre when carrying out her work at anchor = One prolonged followed by two short blasts A power-driven vessel underway but stopped and making no way through the water = Four blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by three short blasts A vessel not under command = Two prolonged blasts in succession

Learn about sound and light signals in accordance with Rules 32-35, including vessel equipment requirements, maneuvering and warning signals, and definitions.

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